Mathematics major

mhcc.edu/Mathematics

Faculty Adviser

Robert Hauss: 503-491-7383 | Room AC2576 | Robert.Hauss@mhcc.edu
David Favreault: 503-491-7608 | Room AC2572 | David.Favreault@mhcc.edu

The Mathematics curriculum at MHCC is focused on real applications, problem-solving, appropriate technology use, conceptual understanding, mathematical skills and a discovery/experiential approach to math. We enthusiastically welcome mathematics majors entering at all mathematical levels.

The Math department is pleased to honor exemplary mathematics students with recognition awards, which may include scholarship funds. Details are available from your current math instructor around the fifth week of the term.

There are many careers available for students majoring in math, including actuarial work, education and positions as the math experts in industry and computer science. For more information, please contact a math instructor, the Career Advising Center or visit the website of the Mathematical Association of America.

Curricular Outcomes

At the completion of this curriculum, students should be able to:

  • Effectively communicate a problem-solving process, results and conclusions using mathematical terminology and correct mathematical syntax
  • Apply mathematical concepts, skills, reasoning and modeling to solve problems arising from the real world
  • Model problem situations visually, numerically, graphically and/or algebraically and make connections among various models
  • Demonstrate a command of functions from multiple perspectives
  • Determine if a solution is reasonable, verify results and compare solutions from different approaches
  • Use appropriate technology to analyze and solve mathematical problems
  • Describe and interpret, from multiple perspectives, the purpose and usefulness of the derivative concept
  • Describe and interpret, from multiple perspectives, the purpose and usefulness of the integral concept

See an adviser to personalize this plan and/or to create a plan that starts with the math sequence before calculus. It is possible to start the calculus sequence as late as spring of the first year, take summer classes, and finish by spring of the following year. Students hoping to teach at any level are strongly encouraged to apply for work as a tutor in the Learning Success Center for hands-on experience.

Students interested in pursuing the Mathematics major can complete the following courses toward the Math and Science requirements and/or electives on the AS (recommended), AAOT, ASOT-B, AGS or ASLA degrees. Students are highly encouraged to work with a university transfer adviser to ensure transferability of courses. Admitted students may also log on to Navigate to start the process of building an academic plan based on this major and can notify an adviser for review.

MTH243Statistics I (Course offered online)4
MTH244Statistics II4
MTH251Calculus I: Differential Calculus5
MTH252Calculus II: Integral Calculus5
MTH253Calculus III4
MTH254Calculus IV: Vector Calculus5
MTH255Calculus V: Multivariable/Vector Calculus Part 24
MTH256Differential Equations5
MTH261Linear Algebra4

Transfer Schools

The following shows just one example of how students can complete an Associate of Science degree while also taking lower-division history courses. Be sure to work with an MHCC adviser and the transfer institution you'd like to attend to ensure correct courses are being taken. Not all courses are offered every term. Click on a course number to see what term(s) the course is typically offered.

Plan of Study Grid
First QuarterCredits
MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus 5
WR121 English Composition (Course offered online) 4
Health & Physical Education 3
Elective / university requirement 3
 Credits15
Second Quarter
MTH243 Statistics I (Course offered online) 4
MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus 5
WR122
English Composition: Critical Thinking (Course offered online)
or Technical Report Writing (Course offered online)
4
 Credits13
Third Quarter
MTH244 Statistics II 4
MTH261 Linear Algebra 4
Oral Communication 3-4
Social Science 3-4
 Credits16
Fourth Quarter
MTH254 Calculus IV: Multivariable/ Vector Calculus Part 1 5
Arts & Letters 3-4
Elective / university requirement (PH211 recommended) 5
 Credits13-14
Fifth Quarter
MTH255 Calculus V: Multivariable/Vector Calculus Part 2 4
MTH253 Calculus III 4
Arts & Letters 3-4
Elective / university requirement (PH212 recommended) 5
 Credits16-17
Sixth Quarter
MTH256 Differential Equations 5
MTH299B A Bridge to Upper-Division Mathematics 3
Social Science 3-4
Elective / university requirement (PH213 recommended) 5
 Credits17
 Total Credits90-92

MTH010 Conceptual Arithmetic

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: Students must be either concurrently enrolled in RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, or place above those levels.

This course is for students who need to master the concepts of whole numbers, fractions or decimals. The emphasis of the course is on understanding concepts, estimation, simple measurement, language usage and reasoning skills. Real world applications are used and the reasonableness of answers is stressed. Calculator use is taught for computation. A scientific calculator with a fraction key, algebraic logic and expression playback is required. A specific model of calculator may be required.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Communicate effectively (orally and in writing) a problem solving process, results and conclusions using mathematical terminology and correct mathematical syntax
  2. Complete basic arithmetic calculations and comparisons mentally (including exponents, square roots, single-digit multiplication and operations with powers of ten)
  3. Complete basic fractions computations with appropriate models and real world applications (including reducing, equivalent, converting between improper and mixed number forms, adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing)
  4. Compute answers to percent problems using common fraction equivalents and reasoning
  5. Convert among equivalent forms of fractions, decimals and percent
  6. Create and interpret fraction models, including: shaded figures, number lines, ruler readings, simple probabilities, fraction of a total and division
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division by choosing a correct operation or series of operations in an application context
  8. Determine if a solution is reasonable and verify results
  9. Estimate values of all calculations covered in this course
  10. Identify terms and factors in an expression and evaluate the expression showing steps
  11. Measure accurately using inches, centimeters and millimeters
  12. Model decimal numbers using place value, money, fractions and metric rulers
  13. Model percent using real situations and pictures
  14. Translate large numbers and decimals between word form and numerical form
  15. Use a calculator with one-step entry to simplify expressions, adding parentheses as needed
  16. Use and explain the base ten place value system, including rounding
  17. Use mathematical symbols to represent and answer questions about real situations, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, percent and money
  18. Without calculating, compare a fraction or numerical expression involving fractions to one-half, one and two and explain the relationship

MTH020 Applied Arithmetic and Pre-algebra

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH010; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. A scientific/graphing calculator with fraction output capabilities is required.

This course is intended for both the career-technical and baccalaureate-prep student. It includes the use of mathematics as a language, rational number operations, estimating and approximating, scientific notation, ratios, percents, proportions, the metric and U.S. Customary systems, formula development and evaluation and practical geometry. A scientific/graphing calculator with fraction output capabilities is required and its use is fully integrated in the course. A specific model of calculator may be required.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Determine if a solution is reasonable and verify results
  2. Communicate effectively (orally and in writing) a problem solving process, results and conclusions usingmathematical terminology and correct mathematical syntax
  3. Complete basic arithmetic calculations and comparisons mentally (including square roots, common fraction-decimal-percent equivalents, single-digit multiplication and operations with powers of ten)
  4. Complete basic fractions computations with explanations and/or pictures (including reducing, building, equivalent,fraction of, converting between improper and mixed number forms, adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing)
  5. Compute exact answers to percent problems using technology
  6. Define, apply, estimate, and calculate perimeters and areas of rectangles, triangles, circles and compound figures,including appropriate units
  7. Determine (with explanations) the results of sums, differences, products, and quotients of positive & negativenumbers
  8. Determine which of two quantities (numerical expressions, measurements, fractions, ratios) is bigger conceptually(without calculating) and explain the choice by talking about the operation or the physical meaning
  9. Draw pictures and/or use fraction pieces to represent fractions and fraction arithmetic problems
  10. Estimate values (including one-step calculations, fractions, percents, square roots)
  11. Identify terms in an expression and evaluate the expression showing steps
  12. Measure accurately using inches and centimeter rulers
  13. Mentally compute exact answers to percent problems by moving the decimal (10%), halves (50%) and combinationsthereof
  14. Translate between and compute with large numbers given in word form, scientific notation or numerical form
  15. Use a calculator with one-step entry to simplify expressions, adding parentheses as needed
  16. Use mathematical symbols to represent and answer questions about real situations, like ratios, measurements,writing expressions, etc
  17. Use variables as abbreviations and include units everywhere to prepare for algebra

MTH058 Quantitative Reasoning I

Credits 6Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. Students need a calculator and computer access. Calculator needs MathPrint, fraction and editing capability.

Quantitative Reasoning I prepares students to use non-STEM mathematics to become contributing citizens, educated consumers and effective users of numerical information. Students gain number sense, build estimation skills and solve realistic problems. Students use reasoning, percents, proportions, and formulas. Technology, especially spreadsheets, is used as a problem-solving tool. Clear communication of processes using words, data and symbols is emphasized. This course prepares the student for MTH98 and then MTH105.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Create mathematical models to solve real world problems using formulas, graphs and numerical approaches.
  2. Find areas and perimeters using formulas and conceptually.
  3. Present an argument about quantitative ideas and support it with quantitative data.
  4. Solve and model real world problems involving proportionality.
  5. Solve quantitative problems using numerical skills mentally and with technology.
  6. Solve real world problems using mathematical concepts. (All topics in this course should be taught in context. Emphasis is not on symbolic mathematics but on interpretation and conceptual understanding.)
  7. Use mathematical symbols to model and solve real world problem situations.
  8. Use technology (calculators, spreadsheets, etc.) to represent and solve real world problems.
  9. Use units to communicate process, answers and as a problem solving tool.

MTH060 Beginning Algebra I (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels. A graphing calculator is required. A TI-83 Plus or TI-84 is recommended.

This is the first half of the beginning algebra course for both the baccalaureate-prep and career-technical student emphasizing problem-solving and practical applications using numerical, algebraic and graphical models. The topics covered include the real number system, positive integer exponents, unit conversions and dimensional analysis, simplifying algebraic expressions, modeling and solving problem situations with linear equations and formulas, the Cartesian plane and applications which require the Pythagorean Theorem. A graphing calculator is required and its use is fully integrated in the course.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Simplify and solve basic expressions and equations\\n[Objectives 1a - 1i]
  2. Model data verbally and with equations, graphs and tables of values\\n[Objectives 2a - 2f]
  3. Perform arithmetic arising from real-world applications\\n[Objectives 3a - 3f]
  4. Use units to solve problems and communicate effectively\\n[Objectives 4a - 4c]
  5. Communicate effectively (in writing) a problem-solving process, results, and conclusions using mathematical terminology and correct mathematical syntax\\n[Objectives 5a - 5g]
  6. Use technology to display data and solve problems\\n[Objectives 6a - 6d]

MTH065 Beginning Algebra II (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH060; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels. A graphing calculator is required. A TI-83 Plus or TI-84 is recommended.

This is the second half of the beginning algebra course for both the baccalaureate-prep and career-technical student emphasizing problem-solving and practical applications using numerical, algebraic and graphical models. The topics covered include graphs and equations of lines, negative integer exponents, solving formulas and rational equations and practical geometry. A graphing calculator is required and its use is fully integrated in the course.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Measure and draw figures from 2D geometry\\n[Objectives 1a - 1e]
  2. Use geometric vocabulary and notation for 2D figures and 3D solids\\n[Objectives 2a - 2d]
  3. Solve problems involving 3D geometric solids\\n[Objectives 3a - 3e]
  4. Apply properties of polygons, similar figures and congruent angles in 2D geometry\\n[Objectives 4a - 4f]
  5. Identify, describe and model linear relationships\\n[Objectives 5a - 5g]
  6. Outcome 6 - Simplify expressions and solve equations using the lowest common denominator, common factoring and products of multi-term expressions\\n[Objectives 6a - 6f]
  7. Outcome 7 - Use properties of positive and negative integer exponents\\n[Objectives 7a - 7c]

MTH084 Applied Trigonometry with Modeling

Credit 1Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH065; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels.

This is an introductory course in applied trigonometry. Topics covered include right triangle trigonometry and an introduction to models of compound interest. Practical applications are emphasized.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply right triangle trigonometry to determine vertical and horizontal displacement and slant distance between two points on the Cartesian plane
  2. Convert between decimal degree angle measure and degrees, minutes and seconds
  3. Determine all unknown sides and angles of right triangles using trigonometry
  4. Model constant percentage rate growth using exponential functions
  5. Sketch diagrams from written descriptions
  6. Use diagrams to solve applications including those that involve percent slope

MTH095 Intermediate Algebra with Right Triangle Trigonometry (Course offered online)

Credits 5Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH065; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels. A graphing calculator is required; TI-83 Plus or TI-84 is recommended.

This is an interactive, technology-based course, which investigates the connections and interplay among various mathematical topics for both the baccalaureate-prep and technical-prep student. The function concept is introduced informally. Linear and quadratic functions and their graphs are covered in-depth. Other topics include rational exponents, radical and rational equations, linear and non-linear systems and right triangle trigonometry. A heuristic approach to problem-solving is emphasized with problem situations modeled numerically, algebraically and graphically.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Absolute Value Functions: Demonstrate a basic understanding of absolute value functions of the form y = |mx +b|. See objectives #25-28.
  2. Exponential Functions: Solve real-life percent problems and exponential equations numerically and graphically. See objectives #22-24.
  3. Functions and Modeling: Demonstrate a basic understanding of the function concept, and model applied problems and patterns numerically, graphically, and algebraically. See objectives #6-11.
  4. Linear Functions: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of linear functions and systems, and use linear information given in numerical, graphical or algebraic form. See objectives #12-21.
  5. Overarching: Effectively communicate mathematics using appropriate mathematical terminology and correct mathematical synta,X model and solve problems using a variety of methods, judge the reasonableness of and verify solutions, and maintain and strengthen prerequisites. See objectives #1-5.
  6. Quadratic Functions: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of quadratic functions. See objectives #29-41.
  7. Rational Exponents: Demonstrate an understanding of rational exponents, and simplify expressions and solve equations that involve rational exponents. See objectives #42-46.
  8. Right Triangle Trigonometry: Demonstrate a basic understanding of right triangle trigonometry and how and when to apply it in real-world situations. See objectives #47-50.

MTH098 Quantitative Reasoning II

Credits 4Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH058; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels. Students need a calculator and computer access. Calculator needs MathPrint, fraction and editing capability.

Quantitative Reasoning II prepares students to use non-STEM mathematics to become contributing citizens, educated consumers and effective users of numerical information. Students develop critical thinking skills and solve realistic problems. Students use iterative processes, advanced percents, linear and exponential functions, and data in mathematical modeling. Technology, especially spreadsheets, is used as a problem-solving tool. Clear communication of processes using words, data and symbols is emphasized. This course prepares the student for MTH105.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Linear & Exponential Models: Compare and contrast linear and exponential functions.
  2. Linear & Exponential Models: Create and use linear models as a problem-solving tool.
  3. Linear & Exponential Models: Determine if a situation is exponential by investigating relative change in the given model (numeric, graph, algebraic, and in context).
  4. Linear & Exponential Models: Determine if a situation is linear by investigating constant rate of change in the given model (numeric, graph, algebraic, and in context).
  5. Linear & Exponential Models: Determine slope as a ratio and interpret in context using units of input and output.
  6. Linear & Exponential Models: Determine the slope in linear contexts.
  7. Linear & Exponential Models: Identify whether a growth or decay model shows additive growth, exponential (multiplicative) growth or neither of the above, using tables, graphs, written descriptions, spreadsheets and equations.
  8. Linear & Exponential Models: Interpret the meaning of input/output pairs, including horizontal and vertical intercepts, in the context of real-world situations.
  9. Linear & Exponential Models: Write an exponential equation, given relative change and initial value. Given an exponential equation, determine the relative change and initial value.
  10. Linear & Exponential Models: Write the equation of a line, given slope and intercept. Given the equation of a line, determine the slope and intercept.
  11. Modeling / Problem-Solving: Create appropriate visual representations of quantitative information using technology, including bar charts and pie charts starting with categorical counts/percentages (not raw data).
  12. Modeling / Problem-Solving: Create input/output graphs using technology.
  13. Modeling / Problem-Solving: Identify how choices such as scale and dimension can be used in visual representations to highlight specific attributes of quantitative information.
  14. Modeling / Problem-Solving: Interpret visual representations of quantitative information, including input/output graphs on the Cartesian plane, bar charts, and pie charts.
  15. Modeling / Problem-Solving: Model linear and exponential functions numerically, graphically, algebraically, and in context (both explicitly and iteratively).
  16. Modeling / Problem-Solving: Solve linear and exponential equations graphically.
  17. Modeling / Problem-Solving: Solve problems using multiple representations of data models, including tables, graphs, algebraic expressions, pictures and spreadsheets.
  18. Modeling / Problem-Solving: Solve relationships by extending a numerical pattern.
  19. Numeracy: Compare the relative magnitudes of small/large numbers.
  20. Numeracy: Estimate in context.
  21. Numeracy: Interpret and use large and small numbers written in word form or scientific notation.
  22. Overarching objectives: All topics in this course should be taught in context. Emphasis is not on symbolic mathematics but on interpretation and intuitive understanding.
  23. Overarching objectives: Apply mathematical concepts to real-world situations.
  24. Overarching objectives: Create and use visual tools such as sketches, fraction/percent pictures and graphs to solve problems.
  25. Overarching objectives: Demonstrate clear, coherent communication of process, reasoning, and answers. (If a student chooses to use mathematical symbols, the notation must be correct.)
  26. Overarching objectives: Determine and justify if a solution is reasonable.
  27. Overarching objectives: Solve practical problems using various strategies. Make decisions about each problem situation: how to approach the problem/strategy, with/without technology, which technology, should the answer be exact or approximate, rounding results reasonably.
  28. Overarching objectives: Use prerequisite skills, especially percents, using and creating graphs and tables in varied situations, using units appropriately, solving two-step equations.
  29. Percents: Analyze a situation and determine what number is the base/reference value to which the percent is applied.
  30. Percents: Calculate and interpret results in situations requiring successive percents.
  31. Percents: Interpret and calculate a percent increase or decrease as a comparison to 100%. (e.g. 1.04 or 0.96 )
  32. Symbolic manipulation: Simplify algebraic expressions used in applications at this level.
  33. Symbolic manipulation: Solve (algebraically) and check linear equations in one variable used in applications at this level.
  34. Technology / Spreadsheets: Copy and paste charts and data between and within spreadsheet and word processor software.
  35. Technology / Spreadsheets: Use spreadsheets to compute with iterative processes.
  36. Technology / Spreadsheets: Use tables and graphs in electronic documents to present coherent solutions to problems involving quantitative data.
  37. Units: Predict units of an answer based on a situation and/or formula.
  38. Units: Solve proportional relationships using dimensional analysis techniques.
  39. Units: Use dimensional analysis as a problem-solving technique in many contexts.

MTH105 Mathematics in Society

Credits 5Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH095 or MTH098; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. A graphing calculator is required; TI-84 is recommended. A spreadsheet will be used regularly during class and with homework. Students may use campus computer labs, as needed.

Math in Society provides a solid foundation in quantitative reasoning, symbolic reasoning, and problem-solving techniques needed to be a productive, contributing citizen in the 21st century. We examine a range of real-world problems using the tools of mathematics. The course focuses on development of mathematical decision making and communication. Course material comes from statistics, financial literacy and modeling growth & decay. Students develop as capable problem solvers including using a spreadsheet as a problem-solving tool.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. COMMUNICATION: Communicate mathematical results in common language and interpret common language questions to determine appropriate mathematical responses.
  2. APPLICATION: Use percents, measures of change, rates/ratios, descriptive and visual statistics, modeling, and spreadsheets to understand and explain real-world topics, including consumer ability/personal finance and current events/issues as presented in the media.
  3. PROBLEM SOLVING: Create and present coherent, efficient, reasoned, valid solutions to situations requiring problem solving. (Objectives 1-6)
  4. MODELING: Create and use linear and exponential explicit models. Model linear, exponential and other situations using spreadsheets and iterative processes. (Objectives 7-12)
  5. ERRORS: Avoid common errors in using mathematics at this level. (Objectives 13-15)
  6. STATS: Use and interpret descriptive and visual statistics beyond a basic level. (Objectives 16-22)
  7. PERCENTS: Use and interpret percents with versatility, including applications to personal finance. (Objectives 23-32)
  8. EXTREME VALUES: Use any skill in this course with very large numbers (millions, billions, trillions) and very small numbers (less than a whole percent).
  9. COMPARISONS: Compute, use, interpret and recognize in context: absolute, relative and rates of change.
  10. RATES/RATIOS: Compute, use, interpret and recognize in context: rates and ratios. (Example: 23 cases per 100,000 people, 14,250 doses for 4.3 million people.)

MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions (Course offered online)

Credits 5Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH095; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. A graphing calculator is required; TI-83 Plus or TI-84 is recommended.

This course provides an extensive study of functions and their inverses modeled algebraically, numerically and graphically. Specific functions include exponential, logarithmic, polynomial and power functions. Modeling real world applications is emphasized.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply mathematical reasoning and modeling to solve problems arising from the real world
  2. Approximate extrema and intervals where a function is increasing, decreasing or constant from a numerical orgraphical model
  3. Communicate effectively (orally and in writing) a problem solving process, results and conclusions using mathematical terminology and correct mathematical syntax appropriate to the level of study
  4. Demonstrate the inverse relationship between an exponential function and a logarithmic function (with the samebase)
  5. Determine if a solution is reasonable and verify results
  6. Determine the domain and range of functions
  7. Evaluate, apply and interpret function notation, including the notation for inverse functions and composition offunctions
  8. Identify asymptotes for exponential, logarithmic and power functions
  9. Maintain and strengthen prerequisites especially: percents, linear and quadratic functions, solving equations
  10. Make connections among various models
  11. Model problem situations using mathematics verbally, numerically, visually, graphically and/or algebraically
  12. Recognize an exponential relationship given numerically or verbally, determine the growth/decay rate and use this information to write an equation to model the relationship
  13. Answer practical questions about exponential functions involving discrete and continuous growth models including compounded interest rates evaluated in various ways such as annually, quarterly, monthly, daily, hourly.
  14. Recognize and generate appropriate models for real-world data
  15. Recognize and sketch the graphs of basic functions and relations, without notes or calculator
  16. Sketch or describe the possible shape of a polynomial function of degree “n” including: the number of turning points, number of possible real roots and end behavior
  17. Solve equations algebraically using properties of exponents and logarithms
  18. Use the characteristics of basic functions (linear, constant, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, piece-wise), especially slope, intercepts, rate of change, percent change and average change, to answer questions in application situations, to write equations and to create graphs by hand and on the calculator
  19. Use the relationship between the zeros of a polynomial and the factored form to find a graphing window or to write an equation
  20. Use transformations of a basic function to sketch graphs, model situations algebraically and determine domain/range and asymptotes
  21. Visually determine where a graph is concave up or down

MTH112 Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry / Geometry

Credits 5Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH111; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course provides exploration and application of rational and trigonometric functions and their inverses modeled algebraically, numerically and graphically; trigonometric identities and equations; vectors; parametric equations; and polar equations. Real world applications are emphasized. A graphing calculator is required. TI-83 Plus or TI-84 is recommended. A CAS-capable graphing calculator is recommended for students planning to take calculus.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Algebraically solve linear trigonometric equations for all solutions on one period and determine all solutions graphically
  2. Apply mathematical reasoning and modeling to solve problems arising from the real world. Model problem situations using mathematics verbally, numerically, visually, graphically and/or algebraically
  3. Apply the sine and cosine functions to problems involving vectors (in component or magnitude/direction form), polar coordinates, right triangles, oblique triangles using the laws of sines and cosines
  4. Communicate effectively (orally and in writing) a problem solving process, results, and conclusions using mathematical terminology and correct mathematical syntax
  5. Create a graph by hand and on the calculator of a rational function (given in factored form)
  6. Create tables and graphs of relations defined parametrically
  7. Define the three basic trigonometric functions including graphs, asymptotes and domains and ranges
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of angles measured in radians and degrees, in standard position
  9. Determine if a solution is reasonable and verify results
  10. Determine the amplitude, period, horizontal shift, and midline of a sinusoidal function given in verbal, algebraic, graphic or numeric form and produce the other three forms
  11. Determine the domain, range, intercepts, holes, end behavior, vertical and horizontal asymptotes (if they exist) of a rational function
  12. Distinguish between a vector and a scalar
  13. Estimate or determine values of the sine, cosine and tangent functions and their inverses from the unit circle
  14. Maintain and strengthen prerequisites, especially: function notation, percents, transformations, geometric modeling, basic functions and their graphs, exponential/logarithmic functions and the difference quotient
  15. Make connections among the various models
  16. Perform vector addition, subtraction, and scalar multiplication algebraically and geometrically
  17. Solve application problems involving arc length, sector area, linear and angular velocity
  18. Solve multi-step problems that include the use of reference angles, unit circles, exact angles, symmetry and geometry
  19. Write parametric equations for any line, circle or ellipse

MTH211 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics I

Credits 4Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH095; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. A scientific calculator with a fraction key is required.

This course is part one of mathematics for future K-8 teachers. The course includes problem-solving, functions, the structure of number systems, operations on whole numbers and number theory. Various concrete, pictorial and heuristic problem-solving strategies are used along with algorithmic problem-solving. A required computer component will reinforce the concepts of the course.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Define and model the four basic operations on whole numbers, and analyze the basic algorithms associated with each operation.
  2. Describe and perform operations on sets. Describe the usefulness of sets as problem solving tools.
  3. Describe the history of numeration and the underlying structure of our numeration system.
  4. Identify, describe and use fundamental concepts related to divisibility, factors, multiples, and prime numbers.
  5. Solve problems capably using multiple techniques. Model and interpret elementary mathematics.

MTH212 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics II

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: MTH211 with a grade "C" or better, or instructor consent. A scientific calculator with a fraction key is required.

This course includes mathematics for future K-8 teachers. The course includes problem-solving, the structure of the integer, rational and real number systems, operations on integers, fractions and decimals, ratio and proportion, the meaning and use of percent and graphical statistics. Various concrete, pictorial and heuristic problem-solving strategies are used along with algorithmic problem-solving. A required computer component will reinforce the concepts of the course.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Communicate effectively, in writing and orally, a problem solving process to model and interpret elementary mathematics.
  2. Define integers, rational numbers, and decimals and model and perform algorithms for operations on each of these family of numbers.
  3. Define the meaning of percent, identify the equivalence among percents, decimals and fractions, and use percent in problem solving.
  4. Describe the meaning of ratios and proportions along with techniques for using ratios and proportions to represent and solve problems.

MTH213 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics III

Credits 4Spring

Registration Requirement: MTH212 with a grade of "C" or better; or instructor consent.

This course is mathematics for future K-8 teachers. Various concrete, pictorial and heuristic problem-solving strategies are used to explore geometry, measurement, probability and numerical statistics. The course includes two- and three-dimensional shapes and their properties, standard/nonstandard measurement basic probability and numerical statistics.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Communicate effectively, in writing and orally, a problem solving process to model and interpret elementary geometry concepts.
  2. Define and use probability and counting techniques related to computing probabilities of events.
  3. Define and use the concept of congruence and similarity.
  4. Define, identify, and categorize classifications and properties of two- and three- dimensional figures.
  5. Define, interpret, and use basic statistical concepts.
  6. Describe, recognize, and create various symmetries and techniques for tessellating the plane.
  7. Explain and use the basic ideas and formulas for measuring perimeter and area, surface area and volume.
  8. Measure and interpret lengths, areas, volumes, temperatures, and weights with basic systems used to measure.

MTH243 Statistics I (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH105 or MTH111; each with a grade of "C" or better. A graphing calculator (TI-83 Plus or TI-84) is required and a computer lab component may be incorporated.

This course is a descriptive statistics course including data collection techniques, visual display of data, measures of central tendency and variability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests using randomization techniques. Normal probability distributions are covered. Computer software experience is provided. A graphing calculator and access to a web browser is required. Use of actual data and interpretation of statistical results are emphasized.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. 1) Use the language and notation of statistics to analyze and describe real-world statistical situations.
  2. 2) Identify, create and interpret the appropriate graphical and numerical summary statistics for a given real-world statistical situation.
  3. 3) Use technology and randomization methods to complete the appropriate inferential statistics for a given real-world statistical situation.
  4. 4) Use technology and the normal distribution to aid in the completion of inferential statistics that use randomization methods.

MTH244 Statistics II

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH243; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This is the second course in statistical studies including a deeper look into inferential statistics. The class includes formal construction of confidence intervals & hypothesis tests of one and two populations, Analysis of Variance, goodness-of-fit & contingency tables, linear regression & prediction intervals for bivariate data, data collection techniques & experimental design, probability theory using contingency tables normal distributions, and discrete & binomial probability distributions. Computer software experience is provided. A culminating project, in which students gather samples, make inferences regarding populations & present their findings is required. Use of actual data & interpretation of statistical results are emphasized.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Conduct formal hypothesis tests for means, proportions, difference of means and difference of proportions
  2. Construct and interpret formal confidence intervals for means, proportions, difference of means and difference of proportions
  3. Create and deliver a statistical report including graphical representations of data, analysis of possible sources of bias in sampling, an examination of statistical significance and a conclusion
  4. Create probability distributions for binomial random variables and use them to calculate probabilities
  5. Design and implement a statistical experiment to explore a causal association between two or more variables
  6. Evaluate simple, compound, and conditional probability statements using two-way tables
  7. Perform hypothesis tests for multiple parameters using the chi-square distribution (categorical parameters) or ANOVA (numerical parameters)
  8. Use formal theory to calculate Standard Error for the sample mean, sample proportion, difference of sample means, difference of sample proportions and sample correlation coefficient
  9. Use formulas to find the mean and standard deviation of binomial distributions
  10. Use technology to calculate probabilities and percentile values for normal and t-distributions
  11. Use technology to determine a least squares regression line. Determine a prediction interval for the response variable at any point along that line
  12. Use technology to perform linear regression for multiple variables

MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus

Credits 5Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH112; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels. A CAS-capable graphing calculator is required.

Calculus I covers the concepts, computations and applications of differential calculus. Functions and derivatives will be modeled symbolically, numerically, graphically and in words. A CAS-capable graphing calculator is required.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Determine the limit of a function. [SLO: 1-4, 18]
  2. Identify the properties of continuity and determine if a function is continuous on an interval. [SLO: 5]
  3. Determine the derivative of a function. [SLO 6-10]
  4. Apply limits and derivatives in the context of real world problems. [SLO: 12-16]
  5. Demonstrate the appropriate use and understanding of mathematical notation. [SLO: 11, 17]

MTH252 Calculus II: Integral Calculus

Credits 5Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: MTH251, with a grade of "C" or better.

Calculus II covers the concepts, computation and applications of integral calculus. Functions and integrals are modeled symbolically, numerically, graphically and in words. A CAS-capable graphing calculator is required.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Determine and interpret definite integrals (objectives 1-8)
  2. Determine and interpret antiderivatives (objectives 9-15)
  3. Determine and interpret improper integrals (objectives 18-19)
  4. Use integrals and antiderivatives to solve applied problems (objectives 16, 20-22)
  5. Summarize the main ideas and applications of integral calculus (objective 17)

MTH253 Calculus III

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: MTH252, with a grade of "C" or better. A CAS-capable graphing calculator is required. A computer laboratory may be included.

This is the third course in the calculus sequence covering infinite sequences and series, and an introduction numerical methods in calculus with coding.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Answer applied/conceptual questions from Precalculus, Differential and Integral Calculus and Infinite Series, using numerical techniques. Compare these approximate solutions to exact solutions when exact solutions exist. [See Objectives #1-2]
  2. Communicate mathematics using appropriate mathematical terminology and correct mathematical synta,X model and solve problems using a variety of methods, judge the reasonableness of and verify solutions, maintain and strengthen prerequisites. [See objectives #1-5]
  3. Generate code to approximate Precalculus and Calculus mathematics. [See Objectives #1-2]
  4. Model and solve application problems with sequences and series (finite and infinite). [See Objectives #3-8]
  5. Support understanding of calculus concepts with technology (hand-held and/or computer as appropriate). [See Objectives #1-2]

MTH254 Calculus IV: Multivariable/ Vector Calculus Part 1

Credits 5Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090, WR090 and MTH252, each with a grade of "C" or better. The CAS-capable calculator is required. A required computer component is included outside of class.

This course includes an introduction to multivariable functions, partial derivatives, and integration with multivariate functions. It also includes an introduction to vector calculus including dot and cross products, gradients and directional derivatives, optimization of multivariable functions, vector-valued functions including parametric curves in space and motion, vector fields, and applications.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply differential and integral calculus concepts to vectors and 3D objects described through various coordinate systems (polar, rectangular, cylindrical, or spherical) and 3D objects describing area and volume. [See Objective 29]
  2. Apply differential calculus concepts to multivariable functions. [See Objectives #13-16]
  3. Apply integral calculus concepts to multivariable functions. [See Objectives #17-20]
  4. Apply mathematical reasoning and modeling to solve problems arising from the real world. Mathematically model problem situations verbally, numerically, visually, graphically and/or algebraically. [See objective #1]
  5. Apply understanding and application of functions to a 3D setting (,Xy,z). [See Objectives #8-12]
  6. Communicate (orally and in writing) a problem solving process, results and conclusions using mathematical terminology and correct mathematical syntax.
  7. Determine if a solution is reasonable and verify results. Also, determine if answers are equivalent from the textbook, from the calculator, and answers developed by hand. [See Objectives #2-3]
  8. Identify connections among verbal, numeric, visual, graphical and algebraic models.
  9. Perform and apply vector computations (from both algebraic and geometric perspectives) including vector addition and subtraction, scalar multiplication, magnitude of a vector, unit vector in a given direction, vector components, dot product, cross product, gradients, directional derivatives, critical points, Lagrange, length of an arc, and curvature. [See Objectives #21-28]
  10. Support understanding of multivariable calculus concepts using technology (hand-held and/or computer as appropriate). [See Objectives #4-7]

MTH255 Calculus V: Multivariable/Vector Calculus Part 2

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: MTH254 with a grade of "C" or better. The CAS-capable calculator is required. A required computer component is included outside of class.

This course is a study of vector calculus including vector fields, line integrals, FTC, Green's Theorem, flux, divergence, curl and Stokes' Theorem. It also includes parametric curves and surfaces, as well as change of coordinates via the Jacobian. The CAS-capable calculator is required. A required computer component is included outside of class.

Additional Course Fee: $10.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply calculus concepts to vector fields and line integrals. [Objectives 1-13]
  2. Apply calculus concepts to vector fields and surface integrals. [Objectives 14-21]
  3. Parametrize curves and surfaces in 3 dimensions. [Objectives 28-31]
  4. Summarize and apply the main theorems of vector calculus. [Objectives 22-27]

MTH256 Differential Equations

Credits 5Spring

Registration Requirement: MTH252 with a "C" or better.

This introductory course examines the application of ordinary differential equations as mathematical models for a variety of disciplines. Students explore analytical, graphical and numerical techniques for solving ordinary differential equations and systems of ordinary differential equations. A systems approach is used with relevant linear algebra concepts developed as needed. A CAS-capable graphing calculator is required.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply numerical methods to determine successive approximations to the solution of an initial value ODE or system ofODEs
  2. Assess the value and limitations of the existence and uniqueness theorems for ODEs and systems of ODEs
  3. Define Laplace transform
  4. Describe how numerical methods approximate the solution to an ODE or a system of ODEs
  5. Describe the qualitative solution of an ODE or system of ODEs including equilibrium solutions, sinks, sources, saddles,centers and separatrixes
  6. Determine the general solutions and specific solutions to a linear, constant coefficient system of ODEs
  7. Explain what is meant by a qualitative solution to an ODE
  8. Explain, both geometrically and analytically, the importance of eigenvalues and eigenvectors in determining thesolutions for a system of linear ODEs
  9. Justify basic theorems, including the Linearity Principle, about ordinary differential equations
  10. Model applied situations with ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and with systems of ODEs
  11. Outline the general process for solving ODEs using Laplace transforms
  12. Show that a proposed solution to an ODE or system of ODEs is or is not an actual solution
  13. Sketch the bifurcation diagram associated with a given family of autonomous ODEs
  14. Sketch vector fields, direction fields and slope fields associated with a given ODE or system of ODEs
  15. Solve ODEs using separation of variables, integrating factors and guess-and-check, as appropriate
  16. Transform higher order linear ODEs into systems of first order ODEs

MTH261 Linear Algebra

Credits 4Spring

Registration Requirement: MTH252 with a grade of "C" or better. A CAS-capable calculator is required (e.g. TI-nSpire CX CAS or TI-89).

This course is a study of vectors, matrices, systems of equations, linear transformations, determinants and eigenvectors, primarily in the setting of finite real vector spaces (though examples of other spaces are used in context). Students are introduced to formal proof writing. This course provides the linear algebra necessary for the study of multivariable calculus, differential equations and abstract algebra.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Use vector notation and operations in applied and purely symbolic situations. [Objectives 1-11]
  2. Use matrix notation and operations in applied and purely symbolic situations. [Objectives 12-19]
  3. Describe and apply properties of vector spaces. [Objectives 20-28]
  4. Create and use linear transformations in applied situations. [Objectives 29-33]
  5. Define and calculate eigenvectors and eigenvalues. [Objectives 34-36]
  6. Apply linear algebra in a variety of situations. [Objectives 37-39]
  7. Write and interpret formal proofs. [Objectives 40-41]

MTH275 A Bridge to Upper-Division Mathematics

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: MTH251 with a "C" or better; RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R.

This is a bridge course designed to help students transition from computation-based mathematics to the more proof-based curriculum typical of junior and senior collegiate-level mathematics courses. Students will construct and validate proofs, explore the nature of mathematics, and navigate some of the systems and conventions used within the mathematics community. Prerequisite MTH251.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Develop and negotiate mathematical conventions to communicate ideas;\\n\\n
  2. Develop conjectures about mathematical topics.\\n
  3. Develop definitions (and axioms as necessary) that are needed to prove conjectures.\\n
  4. Provide informal arguments to support or refute conjectures;\\n
  5. Refine informal arguments to produce mathematical proofs;

MTH299B A Bridge to Upper-Division Mathematics

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: MTH251 with a "C" or better; RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a "C" or better; or placement above stated levels.

This is a bridge course designed to help students transition from computation-based mathematics to the more proof-based curriculum typical of junior and senior collegiate-level mathematics courses. Students will construct and validate proofs, explore the nature of mathematics, and navigate some of the systems and conventions used within the mathematics community. Prerequisite MTH251.

Additional Course Fee: $6.00

This course fulfills: Non-Lab Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Develop and negotiate mathematical conventions to communicate ideas;\\n\\n
  2. Develop conjectures about mathematical topics.\\n
  3. Develop definitions (and axioms as necessary) that are needed to prove conjectures.\\n
  4. Provide informal arguments to support or refute conjectures;\\n
  5. Refine informal arguments to produce mathematical proofs;

Course offered online

Cultural Literacy course