Economics major

mhcc.edu/Economics

Faculty Adviser

Peter Cunningham: 503-491-7023 | Room AC2677 | Peter.Cunningham@mhcc.edu

Economics at MHCC focuses on improving economic literacy— the ability to apply economic principles to personal, business and political issues. Transfer students who follow the Principles of Economics sequence at MHCC report superb preparation for upper division courses in economics. Students also report that economics was one of the most significant classes they took as undergraduates—it taught them how to think critically.

Economic majors find jobs in private industry and government. They continue to graduate school in law, political science, economics, business administration and engineering. Economics can provide a student a broad background that can be applied to numerous other areas besides economics.

Electives should be selected with the assistance of an academic adviser. Courses in Political Science, History and Social Science are strongly recommended.

Curricular Outcomes

At the completion of this curriculum, students should be able to:

  • Explain the basic concepts and principles of economics
  • Draw correct conclusions from published graphs and statistics of the economy and economic behavior
  • Verbalize the economic arguments behind current economic policies
  • Distinguish between domestic and international economic issues

Students interested in pursuing the Economics major can complete the following courses toward the Social Science requirement and/or electives on the AS (recommended), ASOT-B, AAOT, AGS or ASLA degrees. Students are highly encouraged to work with a university transfer adviser to ensure transferability of courses. Admitted students may also log on to Navigate to start the process of building an academic plan based on this major and can notify an adviser for review.

EC201Principles of Economics I: Microeconomics (Course offered online)4
EC202Principles of Economics II: Macroeconomics (Course offered online)4

Transfer Schools

 

The following shows just one example of how students can complete an Associate of Science degree while also taking lower-division economics courses. Be sure to work with an MHCC criminal justice adviser and the transfer institution you'd like to attend to ensure correct courses are being taken. Not all courses are offered every term. Click on a course number to see what term(s) the course is typically offered.

Plan of Study Grid
First QuarterCredits
WR121 English Composition (Course offered online) 4
Oral Communication 3-4
Electives / university requirements 6-8
 Credits14
Second Quarter
MTH111 Pre-Calculus I: Elementary Functions (Course offered online) 5
WR122
English Composition: Critical Thinking (Course offered online)
or Technical Report Writing (Course offered online)
4
Arts & Letters 3-4
Elective / university requirement 4
 Credits16-17
Third Quarter
MTH112 Pre-Calculus II: Trigonometry / Geometry 5
Health & Physical Education 3
Electives / university requirements 8
 Credits16
Fourth Quarter
EC201 Principles of Economics I: Microeconomics (Course offered online) 4
MTH251 Calculus I: Differential Calculus 5
Arts & Letters 3-4
Elective / university requirement 4
 Credits16
Fifth Quarter
EC202 Principles of Economics II: Macroeconomics (Course offered online) 4
MTH243 Statistics I (Course offered online) 4
Electives / university requirements 6-7
 Credits14
Sixth Quarter
MTH244 Statistics II 4
Electives, if needed to reach 90 credits 10
 Credits14
 Total Credits90-91

EC115 Introduction to Economics (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels.

An introduction to the basic economic activities of producing, exchanging, consuming, saving and investment for the purpose of preparing a student for the utilization of economics to real-life experiences. This course provides specific examination of the role of economics in the fields of agriculture/natural resources; mechanics and transportation; business and computer technologies; health and human services; engineering technologies; construction and design; and communication technologies. Business administration transfer students should not take the course.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Comprehend the impact of economic events on careers, the workplace and lifelong learning
  2. Define and describe the economic activities (producing, exchanging, consuming, saving and investing) of individuals, companies, labor and government, along with the interdependence of these entities
  3. Demonstrate critical-thinking and decision-making skills on cases drawn from the workplace
  4. Describe the role of the market system in a global economy
  5. Interpret relatively commonplace economics events through the study and application of everyday economic concepts
  6. Students will have a better understanding of fiscal and monetary policy at the end of course.

EC201 Principles of Economics I: Microeconomics (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels. Sophomore standing recommended.

This course examines the market system including essentials of demand and supply analysis, perfectly competitive and imperfectly competitive product and labor markets, international trade and obstacles to international trade, and applications of microeconomic theory to public policy and current social issues.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply marginal analysis to a consumer decision-making model
  2. Demonstrate how the law of comparative advantage can be applied to international trade and trade-related policies
  3. Identify the basic problems of scarcity and how the prices are determined in a market system, using supply and demand analysis
  4. Identify where the market system does not provide correct solutions to problems of externalities and public goods
  5. Illustrate how businesses can apply marginal analysis to decisions about production, pricing, and promotion, under conditions of perfectly competitive and imperfectly competitive markets

EC202 Principles of Economics II: Macroeconomics (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: EC115 or EC201; or instructor consent.

This course explores the factors affecting the level of national income, the essentials of money and banking, the role of government expenditure and taxation in achieving economic stability and growth, and international monetary issues including exchange rates and the balance of payments.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the international economy and its major elements including balance of payments, exchange rates and monetary fiscal policy in an open economy
  2. Differentiate various theories and how the national economy operates and the problems that arise involving the national economy
  3. Identify fiscal and monetary policies and how they can be used to help increase economic stability and promote economic growth
  4. Recognize various issues involved with the macro economy including, but not limited to taxation, budget deficits and national debt
  5. Using appropriate terminology, describe the basics of the U.S. economy, how income and production are measured, the use and abuse of economic data

Course offered online

Cultural Literacy course