Criminal Justice Administration major

mhcc.edu/SocialScience

Faculty Adviser

Dr. Chris Gorsek: 503-491-7321 | Room AC2674 | Chris.Gorsek@mhcc.edu

Courses provide students with knowledge about the nature and causes of crime and delinquency, law and the legal system in American society and the decision-making processes of criminal justice agencies. A criminal justice major is broadly educated and provided with courses that directly apply to careers in law and the justice system.

Curricular Outcomes

At the completion of this curriculum, students should be able to:

  • Explain how the criminal justice system functions and fits into the overall U.S. society
  • Compare and contrast the various theories of why people offend
  • Compare and contrast the structure and function of the federal and state court system
  • Compare and contrast the various goals of punishment
  • Explain the value of prison treatment programs as well as community corrections

Students interested in pursuing the Criminal Justice major can complete the following elective courses toward the AS, AAOT, AGS or ASLA degrees. Students are highly encouraged to work with a university transfer adviser to ensure transferability of courses. Admitted students may also log on to Navigate to start the process of building an academic plan based on this major and can notify an adviser for review.

CJA111Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: Law Enforcement Agencies3
CJA112Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: The Court System (Course offered online)3
CJA113Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: The Corrections System3
CJA117Introduction to Homeland Security3
CJA123Exploring Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice3
CJA201Criminal Justice in a Diverse Society3
CJA211Introduction to Criminal Law: Fundamentals3
CJA212Introduction to Criminal Law: Criminal Justice Procedures3
CJA213Introduction to Evidence3
CJA214Introduction to Criminal Investigation3
CJA219Introduction to Community Policing3
CJA230Juvenile Crime and the Juvenile Justice Process3
CJA231Understanding Gangs and Responses to Gang Activity3
CJA234Intelligence, Analysis and Security Management3
CJA235Transportation and Border Security3
CJA270Criminology and the Geography of Crime3

Professional Associations and Transfer Schools

The following shows just one example of how students can complete an Associate of Science degree while also taking lower-division criminal justice courses. Be sure to work with an MHCC criminal justice adviser and the transfer institution you'd like to attend to ensure correct courses are being taken. Not all courses are offered every term. Click on a course number to see what term(s) the course is typically offered.

Plan of Study Grid
First QuarterCredits
CJA111 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: Law Enforcement Agencies 3
MTH105 Mathematics in Society 5
WR121 English Composition (Course offered online) 4
Arts & Letters 3-4
 Credits15-16
Second Quarter
CJA112 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: The Court System (Course offered online) 3
CJA201 Criminal Justice in a Diverse Society 3
Science / Math / Computer Science 3-5
Elective / university requirement 4
 Credits14
Third Quarter
CJA113 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: The Corrections System 3
CJA219 Introduction to Community Policing 3
Health & Physical Education 3
Social Science - GEOG107 or GEOG106 recommended 3
Oral Communication 3-4
 Credits16
Fourth Quarter
CJA211 Introduction to Criminal Law: Fundamentals 3
CJA230 Juvenile Crime and the Juvenile Justice Process 3
PSY201 General Psychology (Course offered online) (fulfills one Social Science course) 4
WR227
Technical Report Writing (Course offered online)
or English Composition: Critical Thinking (Course offered online)
4
 Credits14
Fifth Quarter
CJA212 Introduction to Criminal Law: Criminal Justice Procedures 3
CJA214 Introduction to Criminal Investigation 3
PHL202 Fundamental Ethics (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course) (fulfills one Arts & Letters course) 4
PSY239 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology (Course offered online) (fulfills one Social Science Course) 4
Science / Math / Computer Science 3-5
 Credits18
Sixth Quarter
CJA123 Exploring Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 3
CJA213 Introduction to Evidence 3
CJA270 Criminology and the Geography of Crime 3
Science / Math / Computer Science 3-5
 Credits13
 Total Credits90-91

CJA111 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: Law Enforcement Agencies

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course explores the problem of crime in our society today. It also includes a survey of the overall structure and function of the criminal justice system in the United States as well as exploring the operation and function of police agencies. Topics include the types and impacts of crime, crime causation, objectives and functions of the police, and the various methods used to document crime in our country.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze ethical issues in law enforcement
  2. Compare and contrast the various theories relating to why people offend. These theories are broken down into the following areas: Choice/Classical, Sociobiological, Psychological, Sociological, Critical and Developmental
  3. Describe and explain the stresses involved in working in law enforcement and how those stresses may be mitigated
  4. Describe how crime is documented in the U.S. This includes a discussion of Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), National Crime Victimization Surveys (NCVS), the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) and criminal self-report surveys
  5. Describe the elements of the major types of crimes reported as Part I and Part II Crimes in the UCR, as well as the distinction between felonies and misdemeanors
  6. Describe the history of law enforcement and security services
  7. Discuss details on hate crimes and domestic violence
  8. Estimate the average amount of crime that is reported in the U.S. as well as the factors involved in why people may or may not report crime
  9. Explain how the criminal justice system functions as well as how it fits into the overall society of the U.S.
  10. Explain the various theories of Victimization
  11. Illustrate the organizational structure and operation of modern law enforcement

CJA112 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: The Court System (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course explores the role of the courts in the criminal justice system of the United States. Topics include the structure and function of federal and state court systems, the judicial process from arrest to sentencing, the role of the various courtroom actors, basic legal definitions, and the impact of the media on the operation of our court system.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast the structure and function of the federal and state court systems
  2. Describe how the appeals process works in the U.S
  3. Explain the concept of checks and balances as well as the overall structure of government at both the state andnational levels in the U.S.
  4. Explain the history, structure and function of the U.S. Supreme Court

CJA113 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration: The Corrections System

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090,or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course examines what happens to a defendant once he or she is found guilty of a crime. Topics include sentencing, jail operations, the sociology and psychology of confinement, prison organization, prison treatment programs, probation and parole, as well as current problems within the U.S. corrections system.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze the effectiveness of the death penalty
  2. Analyze the various sentencing models in use today
  3. Assess arguments for and against the death penalty
  4. Assess current problems in prison systems including: overcrowding, riots, thefts, assaults, drug use, mental illness,disease and sexual predation
  5. Compare and contrast the role of probation and parole officers
  6. Compare and contrast the various goals of punishment
  7. Define the role of corrections officers and wardens in the prison system
  8. Describe how community corrections systems operate
  9. Describe the general operation and structure of prison and jail facilities today. This includes a look at the planning ofnew facilities and the implications for the NIMBY response (not in my backyard)
  10. Discuss the issues of inmate control within prisons
  11. Discuss the problems faced by people on probation and parole
  12. Evaluate prison treatment programs, including a discussion of the value of pre-release programs
  13. Examine the demographics of prison populations and its implications for racial prejudice within the criminal justicesystem of the U.S.
  14. Explain juvenile justice operations in the U.S.
  15. Explain the history of confinement
  16. Explain the history of the use of the death penalty in the U.S.
  17. Explain the sociology of confinement including the prison social system and patterns of inmate adjustment
  18. Identify the process of readjusting to society when an inmate is released as well as concerns about recidivism

CJA117 Introduction to Homeland Security

Credits 3

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels.

This course introduces students to the vocabulary and important components of Homeland Security. The importance of the agencies associated with Homeland Security and their interrelated duties and relationships is discussed. Historical events that impact Homeland Security are examined and state, national and international laws impacting Homeland Security are explored. Also examined are the most critical threats confronting Homeland Security. Offered at irregular intervals.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compose a historical time line reflecting methods and outcomes used by national and international law enforcement and military agencies to counter and combat terrorism
  2. Construct a historical time line reflecting significant terrorist threats and events in the United States and globally
  3. Convey factual information in order to coordinate law enforcement agencies
  4. Describe the essential characteristics of national and international acts of terrorism
  5. Examine and interpret forensic evidence to reconstruct crime and terrorism
  6. Explain the roles, functions of, and interdependency between local, federal and international law enforcement and military agencies to counter and combat terrorism
  7. Identify ethical and unethical attitudes and actions regarding the execution of Homeland Security practices
  8. Identify the characteristics, ideologies, motives and behaviors of various extremist and terrorist groups that foster and support terrorist, criminal activities
  9. Illustrate effective strategies to generate useful information for local, national and international law enforcement agencies
  10. Prepare clear, concise and accurate reports to provide factual information, accurate data analysis, and sound recommendations

CJA123 Exploring Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090,or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. CJA111, CJA112 and CJA113 recommended.

This class explores the concept of crime literacy which is focused upon questioning some of the basic assumptions that we have about crime and the criminal justice system in our country. Thus, we explore those assumptions and shed new light upon issues that have in some cases become distorted and inaccurate, frequently because of media coverage.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast the aforementioned beliefs with current research statistics on crime and the criminal justicesystem in the U.S. using critical thinking skills
  2. Define key concepts in the course such as crime literacy
  3. Describe how crime myths are created and perpetuated in our society
  4. Describe how crime myths work to mask social problems
  5. Identify some of the key beliefs that we have about crime and the criminal justice system in this country
  6. Identify ways that we can deal with the inconsistencies we see between our commonly held beliefs about thecriminal justice system and current statistics and research findings

CJA201 Criminal Justice in a Diverse Society

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course is designed to explore the issues surrounding the operation of the criminal justice system in a culturally diverse society. Topics include a discussion of race and ethnicity; group dynamics and communications; the experience of Native Americans, African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, Arab- Americans, Asian-Americans (including Pacific Islanders), women, the elderly, gays and transgender people with/within the criminal justice system; and strategies for success in making criminal justice agencies more effective in serving diverse communities.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze the impact of racist statements made by both politicians and law enforcement officials, on the average minority citizen in this country
  2. Define hate crimes and explain how those crimes have affected minority communities
  3. Describe racial profiling and explain the recent problems that have surfaced in this country involving African Americans, Arab Americans and Hispanic Americans
  4. Describe the nature of social interaction
  5. Describe the various types of minority groups in U.S. society today
  6. Discuss the history of the various minority groups in the US especially as it relates to the criminal justice system
  7. Discuss the value of recent attempts in Oregon to address the treatment of minorities in the criminal justice system
  8. Explain how bias and racism may be reduced
  9. Explain the value of multiculturalism

CJA211 Introduction to Criminal Law: Fundamentals

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. CJA111, CJA112 and CJA113 recommended.

This course is designed to survey the fundamentals of criminal law. It is intended for students who are considering employment in the field of law enforcement. Topics which may be covered include the history of criminal law, concepts of criminal responsibility and liability and the characteristics of selected crimes.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the concepts of criminal responsibility and liability
  2. Evaluate and explain major periods and events in the history of criminal law
  3. Evaluate selected offenses against public order such as gambling, narcotics and prostitution
  4. Explain the characteristics of crime against persons and crimes against property

CJA212 Introduction to Criminal Law: Criminal Justice Procedures

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course surveys the essentials of criminal procedures. Topics covered may include search and arrest procedures, criminal court proceedings, federal and state reports and Oregon Criminal Code sections.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe federal and state procedures relative to the use of warrants and interrogation
  2. Describe the federal and state procedures to be used when writing reports
  3. Evaluate and explain state and federal laws and statutes, which control police, conduct in searches of persons and property
  4. Examine individual rights and liberties, including the freedom of speech

CJA213 Introduction to Evidence

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course surveys the fundamental legal rules which apply to the gathering and use of evidence in criminal cases. Topics include the history of evidence law, the "hearsay" and "Miranda" rules, differences between public and private documents, the nature and use of circumstantial evidence, documentary and photographic evidence and physical evidence.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe differences between public and private documents
  2. Describe the history of evidence law
  3. Describe the use of documentary and photographic evidence
  4. Explain the “hearsay” and “Miranda” rules
  5. Explain the nature and use of circumstantial evidence
  6. Explain the use of physical evidence

CJA214 Introduction to Criminal Investigation

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

Police officers are charged with keeping the peace and investigating criminal behavior in our society. This course explores the key components of those criminal investigations. Topics include the history and theory of criminal investigations, the procedures used to investigate and document criminal behavior and the importance of good written reports in communicating findings to attorneys, judges and other criminal justice professionals.

Additional Course Fee: $15.00

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Explain the proper way to testify in court
  2. Describe proper methods from crime scene searches
  3. Describe the control and preservation of crime scenes
  4. Describe the history of criminal investigation
  5. Describe the importance of fingerprints and DNA in criminal investigations
  6. Describe the proper documentation and collection of evidence at a crime scene as well as the importance ofmaintaining the chain of evidence
  7. Explain Locard’s Theory of Exchange
  8. Explain proper interview and interrogation techniques
  9. Explain proper note taking and report writing techniques
  10. Explain the ethical issues involved in any criminal investigation
  11. Explain the proper methods to follow in any preliminary investigation

CJA219 Introduction to Community Policing

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

There has long been an interest in the relationship between the police and the community that they serve. This course is designed to study the evolution of that relationship in the United States. Community policing emphasizes the need for the police and the community to work together to solve neighborhood problems before they become more serious situations requiring legal intervention. During the class we will explore such topics as the history of police-community interactions, the various types of community policing models currently in use and the potential future for this type of law enforcement.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze the potential future for this type of law enforcement
  2. Describe public perception about police officers, as well as police professionalism
  3. Describe the history of police-community relations
  4. Describe the need for public involvement in policing
  5. Describe the role of improving technology in insulating police officers from society
  6. Explain current programs, philosophies, and strategies designed to foster better relationships between the community and the police
  7. Explain how the development-implementation of Community Policing programs is done
  8. Explain the internal and external resistance to Community Policing programs that may develop

CJA230 Juvenile Crime and the Juvenile Justice Process

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course looks at the issues of child abuse and neglect as well as juvenile crime and the system designed to prevent it. Topics include: the history of childhood; the history of juvenile behavior, treatment and punishment; the various theories of juvenile criminal behavior; the operation of the juvenile justice system today; current treatment programs for juvenile offenders and the future of the juvenile justice system. This class focuses on issues within the U.S. and Europe.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast the various theories relating to why juveniles offend
  2. Compare and contrast treatment approaches for juvenile offenders, including: Psychotherapy, Transactional Analysis,Reality Therapy, Behavior Modification and Gang Deactivation
  3. Define what status offenses are and explain why some people would like to do away with them
  4. Differentiate between the terminology used in adult courts and the terminology used in juvenile courts
  5. Discuss sentencing issues for juveniles, including remand to adult court and the death penalty
  6. Estimate the likelihood of becoming a juvenile crime victim, including issues related to child neglect
  7. Evaluate interactions between the police and juveniles. This includes an assessment of such issues as racial profilingby the police
  8. Evaluate the current trends in juvenile crime in the U.S.
  9. Explain how the current juvenile justice system operates in the U.S.
  10. Explain the effects of institutionalization on juveniles
  11. Explain the function of community based corrections and juvenile aftercare
  12. Explain the history of juvenile punishment and treatment
  13. Explain the social context of juvenile crime including: family, school, peers, neighborhoods and gangs
  14. Explore how social science/criminal justice research is pursued and why juvenile justice research needs improvement
  15. Formulate an effective program for dealing with delinquent children

CJA231 Understanding Gangs and Responses to Gang Activity

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This class provides the student with an understanding of gangs and gang members in American society. Topics include the history of gangs, the various types of gangs, the gang subculture, the criminal behavior of gang members, female involvement in gang activity, the reasons gangs exist, gang intervention strategies and the criminal justice system's response to gangs.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the various theories related to why kids get involved in gangs
  2. Describe gang subcultures
  3. Describe how the criminal justice system responds to illegal activity perpetrated by gang members
  4. Describe the various issues surrounding the involvement of females in gang activity
  5. Explain the history of gangs in the U.S.
  6. Explore community intervention and prevention programs and their components
  7. Identify the various types of gangs in our society

CJA234 Intelligence, Analysis and Security Management

Credits 3

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course examines intelligence analysis and its indispensable relationship to the security management of terrorist attacks, man-made disasters and natural disasters. It also explores the vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors, as well as the threats posed to these institutions by terrorists, man-made disasters, and natural disasters. Students discuss substantive issues regarding intelligence support of homeland security measures implemented by the United States and explore how the intelligence community operates. Offered at irregular intervals.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply sound reasoning using various forms of intelligence, in order to formulate predictions and forecasts relating to terrorist activities
  2. Demonstrate operational knowledge of intelligence gathering and analysis pertinent to homeland security and other threats facing government and private sectors
  3. Describe the basic intelligence policies and functions of the United States Government
  4. Describe the foundation and goals for security
  5. Evaluate the dependability and reliability of source information
  6. Explain ethical and professional behavior issues related to intelligence gathering and operations
  7. Explain specific methods and / or techniques for obtaining intelligence, synthesizing it and analyzing it
  8. Explain the meaning of and purpose for the Intelligence Reform & Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004
  9. Identify, describe and analyze threats to national and international safety and security
  10. Illustrate basic intelligence gathering techniques and analysis
  11. Test and evaluate intelligence in light of critical judgment and evidentiary analysis

CJA235 Transportation and Border Security

Credits 3

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels.

This course provides an overview of modern border and transportation security challenges, as well as the different methods that are employed to address those challenges. The course explores topics associated with border security and security for transportation infrastructure, including seaports, ships, aircraft, airports, trains, train stations, trucks, highways, bridges, rail lines, pipelines and buses. Technological solutions employed to enhance the security of borders and transportation systems are explored. Students are required to discuss the legal, economic, political and cultural concerns and impacts associated with transportation and border security. Offered at irregular intervals.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Construct a historical time line reflecting significant transportation related terrorist threats and events in the United States and globally
  2. Demonstrate basic verbal and communication skills, and write clear, concise and accurate reports to provide factual information, accurate data analysis, and logical recommendations
  3. Describe knowledge of the impact of technology on countering threats to transportation systems and border security
  4. Describe the various modes of transportation in the US and their industries as it may impact security
  5. Discuss the differences in dealing with security threats for passenger versus freight/cargo transportation systems including the impact on supply chain logistics
  6. Discuss the supply chain logistics and modes of transportation
  7. Identify general vulnerabilities and risks in transportation systems and border security systems
  8. Identify the primary federal and state/local agencies in the US who are affiliated with Border Security and Transportation Security, their resources and the ethical parameters in which they operate
  9. Identify the roles, functions, and interdependency between local, federal, and international law enforcement and military agencies to foster border security

CJA270 Criminology and the Geography of Crime

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course is designed to give students a deeper understanding of criminal behavior and the interactions between human beings and the environment as it relates to unlawful behavior. Topics include discussions relating to basic criminological theories as well as the geography of crime, defensible space theory, broken windows theory and routine activities theory, among others. This class is also taught as GEOG270. Students may receive credit as either CJA270 or GEOG270, but not both.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Define the term - crime hot spot
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in identifying and defining various crime causations theories
  3. Describe the history of criminological theory
  4. Evaluate crime causation theories
  5. Explain determinism and possibilism
  6. Explain how mapping is used in the criminal justice system
  7. Explain the links between crime and the environment
  8. Explain ways of mapping criminal activity
  9. Explain why crime is not uniformly distributed in a community

CJA280C Coop Ed-Criminal Justice

Credits 3

Registration Requirement: RD090, WR090 and MTH20 each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. Must be enrolled in a certificate or degree program. Instructor and Dean's signature required.

Repeatable for up to 12 elective credits.

CJA298 Independent Study - Reading and Conference: Criminal Justice

Credits 3Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. Instructor consent is required.

This course focuses on an in-depth study of a topic in criminal justice by a student through the reading of a book or series of articles on the subject at hand. The student will then write a term paper discussing the main themes, of the readings and the student's evaluation of them. The student will contact the instructor weekly and meet face-to-face with the instructor four times during the term to discuss his/her progress or seek guidance in the research or writing process.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate proper writing style, source citations and bibliography construction
  2. Demonstrate the ability to use critical thinking in discussing criminal justice related topics
  3. Evaluate the criminal justice research of professionals in the field
  4. Express an understanding of the criminal justice material at hand through the writing of a term paper

Course offered online

Cultural Literacy course