Art major

mhcc.edu/VisualArts

Faculty Advisers

John Hasegawa: Website | YouTube |  503-491-7149 | Room VA30D | John.Hasegawa@mhcc.edu | Ceramics 
Matteo Neivert: Website | Instagram | 503-491-6967 | Room VA30B | Matteo.Neivert@mhcc.edu | Painting
Nathan Orosco: Website | 503-491-6968 | Room VA30C | Nathan.Orosco@mhcc.edu | Sculpture, Basic Design
Edie Overturf: Website | 503-491-6947 | Room VA30A | Edie.Overturf@mhcc.edu | Printmaking, Drawing

The Visual Art curriculum is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year institution in order to pursue a BA/BFA in the Visual Arts and/or a career in arts-related fields. Students focus on the development of art processes, techniques, design elements and a visual vocabulary for personal expression.  Classes explore both traditional and non-traditional art modalities.  Faculty encourage students to utilize analytical and creative problem-solving skills.  Students apply art concepts and ideas through hands-on experience and peer critiques.  Our four full-time faculty maintain active professional careers by exhibiting nationally and practice diverse teaching philosophies.  The Visual Art department houses well-equipped studios for painting, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, drawing, metalsmithing, digital graphics and a large exhibition gallery with performance/lecture spaces.

Student drawing in ART231 Drawing 1

Curricular Outcomes

At the completion of this curriculum, students should be able to:

  • Exhibit competence in visual language through the creative art practice
  • Apply rational and critical thinking skills when developing a project from concept to form
  • Identify the historical, multicultural and contemporary context they are working in
  • Articulate ideas expressed in artwork by integrating oral, written and visual communication skill

Students interested in pursuing the Art major can complete the following courses toward the Arts & Letters requirement and/or electives on the AS (recommended), AAOT, AGS or ASLA degrees. Students are highly encouraged to work with a university transfer adviser to ensure transferability of courses. Admitted students may also log on to Navigate to start the process of building an academic plan based on this major and can notify an adviser for review.

Art Courses

ART115Basic Design I: Two-Dimensional4
ART116Basic Design II: Color Theory4
ART117Basic Design III: Three- Dimensional4
ART204History of Western Art: Prehistoric - Byzantine (Course offered online)4
ART205History of Western Art: Medieval - Renaissance (Course offered online)4
ART206History of Western Art: Baroque - Modern (Course offered online)4
ART225Adobe Illustrator: Digital Art4
ART226Adobe Photoshop: Digital Art4
ART231Drawing I4
ART232Drawing II4
ART233Drawing III4
ART234Figure Drawing I4
ART235Figure Drawing II4
ART236Figure Drawing III4
ART240Illustration and Cartooning4
ART244Visual Storytelling4
ART254Ceramics I4
ART255Ceramics II4
ART256Ceramics III4
ART257Jewelrymaking/Metalsmithing I4
ART258Jewelrymaking/Metalsmithing II4
ART259Jewelrymaking/Metalsmithing III4
ART260Digital Photography and Imaging4
ART261Photography I3
ART262Photography II3
ART271Printmaking I: Screenprint and Woodcut4
ART272Printmaking II: Silkscreen, Woodcut, and Intaglio4
ART273Printmaking III4
ART281Painting I4
ART282Painting II4
ART283Painting III4
ART291Sculpture I4
ART292Sculpture II4
ART293Sculpture III4
ART294Watercolor I4
ART296Watercolor II4
ART297Watercolor III4

Art electives

ART219ACalligraphy - Bookhand2
ART219BCalligraphy - Italics2
ART219CCalligraphy - Historical and Decorative Styles2
ART225Adobe Illustrator: Digital Art4
ART226Adobe Photoshop: Digital Art4

Survey Courses - for non-art majors

ART211Survey of Visual Arts (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)4
ART215PSurvey in Visual Arts: Photography3

Transfer Schools

The following shows just one example of how students can complete an Associate of Science degree while also taking lower-division art courses. Be sure to work with an MHCC art adviser and the transfer institution you'd like to attend to ensure correct courses are being taken.  Not all courses are offered every term. Click on a course number to see what term(s) the course is typically offered.

Plan of Study Grid
First QuarterCredits
ART115 Basic Design I: Two-Dimensional 4
ART204 History of Western Art: Prehistoric - Byzantine (Course offered online) 4
ART231 Drawing I 4
WR121 English Composition (Course offered online) 4
 Credits16
Second Quarter
ART116 Basic Design II: Color Theory 4
ART205 History of Western Art: Medieval - Renaissance (Course offered online) 4
WR122 English Composition: Critical Thinking (Course offered online) 4
Art studio elective 3-4
 Credits16
Third Quarter
ART117 Basic Design III: Three- Dimensional 4
ART206 History of Western Art: Baroque - Modern (Course offered online) 4
Art studio elective 3-4
College-level mathematics 4-5
 Credits16-17
Fourth Quarter
Science / Math / Computer Science 3-5
Social Science 3-4
Art studio electives, 2 courses 6-8
 Credits14-17
Fifth Quarter
Health & Physical Education 3
Science / Math / Computer Science 3-5
Art studio electives, 2 courses 6-8
 Credits14
Sixth Quarter
Social Science 3-4
Oral Communication 3-4
Art studio or other elective(s) to reach 90 credits 6-8
 Credits14-16
 Total Credits90-96

ART115 Basic Design I: Two-Dimensional

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

This class explores the process of using art elements and organizational principles of design in inventing visual images. The course structure is built on the articulation of visual language, terminology, and a survey of creative processes. Creative and rational thinking are emphasized. Class studies in theoretical knowledge are applied in final works of art using a variety of art materials and tools.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Articulate conceptual and practical elements of visual language
  2. Explore a variety of art materials and tools
  3. Explore processes designed to facilitate invented images
  4. Organize art principles and elements into visual outcomes
  5. Recognize relationships between self expression and cultural identity

ART116 Basic Design II: Color Theory

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: ART115 recommended.

This class explores color theory and its applications in designing invented images. Students continue to apply art elements and organizational principles as explored in Basic Design l, adding the complexities of color theories and color harmonies. Students have the opportunity to manipulate color by using a variety of media and supports in designing final art works. Offered at irregular intervals.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply color harmonies in project outcomes
  2. Apply organizational principles into color harmonies
  3. Articulate theories of color harmony
  4. Assimilate basic art elements into color harmonies
  5. Demonstrate cohesion between art elements, organizational principles and color harmonies
  6. Explore a variety of color media
  7. Explore a variety of painting supports

ART117 Basic Design III: Three- Dimensional

Credits 4Spring

This studio course is an introduction to the basic concepts of three-dimensional design. The class practices 3D design with projects that investigate the fundamental concepts and utilization of the formal elements such as line, point, the plane and mass. This provides the foundation to work with space, content and function pertaining to materials in real and virtual space and is an introduction to practices used in sculptural design, fashion design, environmental sustainable design, industrial design and architectural design. Using design-based materials, assigned projects help develop an understanding of sculptural and design considerations while expanding conceptual and material ability.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. "Analyze ""accidents"" within the design process as possible avenues of exploration
  2. Apply fundamental visual and design concepts to their three-dimensional forms including distinguishing functional considerations from aesthetic considerations, and comprehending material and conceptual dimensions
  3. Communicate fundamental visual concepts through critical discussion using appropriate vocabulary
  4. Demonstrate a beginning comprehension of the creative process as it applies to three-dimensional forms by using tools, materials, processes, influences, concepts, design parameters and elements of personal expression
  5. Demonstrate a fundamental ability with tools, materials and processes applicable to three-dimensional design
  6. Develop a three-dimensional design from concept to form using drawings as working aids
  7. Identify potential influences that will affect how they perceive and create three-dimensional forms that may include personal, cultural, physical/ environmental, game design, and historical/ art historical
  8. Participate in the assessment of their own three-dimensional forms and those of others through evaluation processes that may include critical discussion, teacher evaluation, peer evaluation and/or self-evaluation
  9. Relate the fundamentals of aesthetics and functional decision making to their own and other students' projects
  10. "

ART123TEST Test Course for AIR

Credits 0Winter

This is a test course for the AIR team.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Survey people about products and other things.
  2. Third outcome added, but I've moved it to the second position
  3. Steal home plate
  4. adding fourth course outcome

ART198A Independent Studies: Visual Arts

Credit 1Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: Enrollment requires a written project proposal that must be approved by the instructor and dean before registration.

This course is designed for individual projects for interdisciplinary or in-depth work in visual art not normally covered in an existing course. A maximum of three credits can be earned for any combination of ART198A/B/C.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate competency in completion of individual project proposal requirements
  2. Participate in the assessment of their artwork
  3. Participate verbally in critical discussion of work using appropriate vocabulary

ART198B Independent Studies: Visual Art

Credits 2Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

This course is designed for individual projects for interdisciplinary or in-depth work in visual art not normally covered in an existing course. A maximum of three credits can be earned for any combination of ART198A/B/C.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate competency in completion of individual project proposal requirements
  2. Participate in the assessment of their artwork
  3. Participate verbally in critical discussion of work using appropriate vocabulary

ART198C Independent Studies: Visual Art

Credits 3Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

This course is designed for individual projects for interdisciplinary or in-depth work in visual art not normally covered in an existing course. A maximum of three credits can be earned for any combination of ART198A/B/C.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate competency in completion of individual project proposal requirements
  2. Participate in the assessment of their artwork
  3. Participate verbally in critical discussion of work using appropriate vocabulary

ART204 History of Western Art: Prehistoric - Byzantine (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 or IECC201R with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course level.

This course provides an introduction to Western art, from c. 8000 B.C.E. to c. 1400 C.E., covering the major cultures and empires of the ancient Western world. Studies include art and architecture from the ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, Aegean and Etruscan cultures. This course travels through the transformative art and architecture of the ancient Greek and Roman Empires. Studies conclude by surveying evolutions of the pantheon of ancient works into early Christian and Byzantine expressions. Instruction focuses primarily on painting, sculpture and graphics, and covers selected examples of architecture to introduce key principles and centers for each period. This course is designed for non-majors as well as art majors.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze and discuss art through the use of formal art-historical interpretations.
  2. Explore why we value art by examining the artistic impulse.
  3. Recognize art and architecture from the following regions of Western art history:-Ancient Near East-Ancient Egypt-Ancient Aegean-Ancient Greece-Ancient Etruria-Ancient and Late Rome-Early Byzantium

ART205 History of Western Art: Medieval - Renaissance (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 or IECC201R with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course level.

This course provides an introduction to Western art, from c. 500 B.C.E to c. 1600 C.E., covering major European stylistic periods. Studies include art and architecture of early Islamic and Medieval cultures, and the engineering marvels of the Romanesque and Gothic cathedrals. This course travels through the explosive Renaissance innovations in Italy and the Northern regions of Flanders, Germany and the Netherlands. Studies conclude with the interpretive forms of Mannerism, a style of art driven by modern sensibilities. Instruction focuses primarily on painting, sculpture and graphics, and covers selected examples of architecture to introduce key principles and centers for each period.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze and discuss art through the use of formal art-historical interpretations.
  2. Explore why we value art by examining the artistic impulse.
  3. Recognize art and architecture from the following stylistic periods of Western art history:- Islamic- Medieval- Romanesque- Gothic- Renaissance: Early, High, Northern- Mannerism

ART206 History of Western Art: Baroque - Modern (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 or IECC201R with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course provides an introduction to Western art, from c. 1600 C.E. to the 20th Century, covering major Western artistic periods. Studies include art and architecture of the Italian Baroque, Dutch Baroque, and French and German Rococo. This course views the land and seascapes of England along with the conservative return to classical ideals, introducing Neoclassical and Romantic styles. In addition, students will observe how modern industrial economies brought new perspectives to art leading to Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. Studies conclude with a fresh look at what is called Modern, as artists react to the horrors of two world wars, and how art becomes personal and aggressive as it confronts an ever changing world.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze and discuss art through the use of formal art-historical interpretations.
  2. Explore why we value art by examining the artistic impulse.
  3. Recognize art and architecture from the following stylistic periods of Western art history:- Baroque and Rococo- Neo-Classicism- Romanticism- Realism- Impressionism and Post-Impressionism- Cubism- Expressionism- Pop Art

ART211 Survey of Visual Arts (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090 or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course is an introduction to historic art movements, cultural influences, visual art genres, artists, and their artwork. Structured around basic design principles and developments in art from the prehistoric through contemporary eras; this course includes discussions of, artists' materials and techniques, hands-on projects, and gallery or museum exhibits.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Discuss art as a means of critical communication.
  2. Apply the elements and principles of design.
  3. Discuss the different forms of art and the media used to create them.
  4. Evaluate how cultural and historic perspectives affect our response to art.
  5. Analyze and critique works of art using terminology and vocabulary specific to the visual arts.
  6. Discuss how social, political, and religious events have shaped visual art.
  7. Apply the concepts and practices of visual abstraction and visual representation in the visual arts.
  8. Demonstrate a basic overview of developments in art history from the prehistoric through contemporary eras.

ART215P Survey in Visual Arts: Photography

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090 or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course is a survey of the history and structures of photography beginning at its inception in the late 18th century through to the present. This course emphasizes 20th century movements, theories and individuals and their influences on fine art, documentary and applied commercial photography.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply critical thinking skills to the influence of significant figures, events, and movements as they relate to contemporary photography
  2. Assess the influences of changing culture and technology on contemporary media and photography
  3. Explain individual photographic styles and relate them to significant historical figures and movements in photography
  4. Recognize the major photographic figures and styles of the 20th century

ART219A Calligraphy - Bookhand

Credits 2Fall

This course is one of three courses that enables students to gain an understanding and technical competence of calligraphy. This course focuses on basic bookhand, plain and Roman capitals. Calligraphic layouts are developed.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate basic proficiency in bookhand, plain and Roman capital forms
  2. Discuss layout and book design
  3. Practice and use calligraphic alphabet in formal compositions
  4. Review the importance of written language to its contemporary time and culture, but also its historical significance/lasting relevance to our understanding of the history of that culture

ART219B Calligraphy - Italics

Credits 2Winter

This course is one of three courses that enables students to gain an understanding and technical competence of calligraphy. This course focuses on italics with a variety of capital forms. Calligraphic layouts are developed.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate basic proficiency in italics and related capital forms
  2. Discuss layout and book design
  3. Practice and use calligraphic alphabet in formal compositions
  4. Review the importance of written language to its contemporary time and culture, but also its historical significance/lasting relevance to our understanding of the history of that culture

ART219C Calligraphy - Historical and Decorative Styles

Credits 2Summer/Spring

This course is one of three courses that enables students to gain an understanding and technical competence of calligraphy. This course focuses on a variety of historical styles and decorative hands. Calligraphic layouts are developed.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate basic proficiency in a variety of historical styles and decorative hands
  2. Discuss layout and book design
  3. Practice and use calligraphic alphabet in formal compositions
  4. Review the importance of written language to its contemporary time and culture, but also its historical significance/lasting relevance to our understanding of the history of that culture

ART225 Adobe Illustrator: Digital Art

Credits 4Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 or IECC201R with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This visual arts course introduces the art student to the use of Macintosh computers and a vector-based drawing program as a visualization tool and a fine art medium. An overview of the Macintosh operating system and working with a variety of peripheral devices is covered. Emphasis is placed on use of the computer as a fine art-making tool. Through applied projects, students learn how to use drawing tools, create paths, elemental graphic shapes, work with type and apply both color and gradient fills. Conceptual as well as technical issues are covered.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply computer art techniques as a means of generating fine art ideas
  2. Apply creative and rational thinking to digital art processes in the practice of making art
  3. Apply fine arts creative processes through medium of computer drawing application
  4. Control and customize the Mac OS work environment through the use of Apple menu, extensions and control panels
  5. Demonstrate developing fluency while creating and modifying paths and strokes, and lines
  6. Demonstrate the appropriate use of graphic (outline) text with sensitivity to introductory typography concerns and practices
  7. Develop beginning fine arts skills in a vector-based drawing program to produce a series of fine art compositions
  8. Develop research and study skills for collecting imagery ideas and production techniques
  9. Draw, color, alter and position elementary graphic shapes using advanced application tools
  10. Incorporate the use of Illustrator layers to manage elements, colors, positions and objects
  11. ldentify Macintosh hardware components, storage devices, peripherals and media types
  12. Manage printer to proof digital files and launches local/remote file servers to obtain network-stored files
  13. Select program functions via menu bar, pop-up sub-menus and keyboard shortcut keystrokes
  14. Select, specify and manage the use of color (CMYK RGB, Custom Spot and Pantone), and create and modify gradients, blends, strokes and fìlls
  15. Use grids, guides, rulers, templates, group, lock, arrange and align actions to accurately position illustration components
  16. Use tools to modify graphic elements (rotate, scale, skew, mirror, shear) and apply values in dialog boxes and free-transform modes

ART226 Adobe Photoshop: Digital Art

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 or IECC201R; and MTH020, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course introduces students to an image-editing program as a means to manipulate photographs as well as create original artwork. Emphasis is placed on the use of technology as a fine art-making tool. The class explores digital paint and drawing tools, filters, color mixing, selection methods, working with layers, and decisions about resolution. Students also gain proficiency with a variety of external hardware. Through class projects, students learn how to alter, improve, create and manage bitmap images. Conceptual as well as technical issues are covered. Self-evaluation and critique are utilized to help students improve.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate digital art techniques as a means of creating fine art.
  2. Apply creative problem solving to digital art processes.
  3. Calculate the relationships of print vs. scan resolution, pixels per inch and dots per inch when planning artwork
  4. Develop research and study skills for collectíng imagery, ideas, and production techniques to build successful artworks
  5. Incorporate the use of layers, channels and transparency to manage elements, colors, positions and objects
  6. Define the historical and cultural influences of image alterations throughout art history.
  7. Work with a variety of image sources: reflective art, stock photography, scanned images, line art and templates as a means to alter reality.
  8. Apply digital media as a means of contemporary digital expression while utilizing the elements of design.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to use Adobe photoshop functions as an expressive creative tool.

ART231 Drawing I

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Drawing I serves as an introduction to the visual language through the traditional processes, tools, and materials used in the practice of drawing. The concepts of basic composition, formal elements of design, and material techniques are explored in conjunction with placement, scale, subject matter, pictorial balance, volume, value, mass, spatial depth, and hand-to-eye coordination. Critical thinking skills and design vocabulary are exercised in individual and group critiques addressing the integration of form with content. Discussions and presentations of drawing ideology expand the students' techniques and perceptions of themselves as artists within a historical and contemporary context.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply visual elements of design principles and vocabulary to drawings
  2. Create the illusion of space in drawings utilizing 1 and 2 point linear perspective
  3. Create the illusion of volume, mass, and space using Chiaroscuro (value- light and shadow), texture, and overlap
  4. Demonstrate a basic proficiency in perceptual seeing by successfully rendering three-dimensional structures on a two-dimensional picture plane
  5. Demonstrate the use of observation from life rendering a still life
  6. Employ traditional drawing tools and basic drawing methods and technique in the construction of finished drawings
  7. Formulate and verbalize thoughts about your drawing and the drawings of others during critique
  8. Recognize composition, emphasis, positive and negative space, geometric shape, proportion, scale, and ratio measurements as a way to comparatively draw form and space
  9. Use drawing processes explored during the course to generate a creative drawing that demonstrates competency in formal elements of design and still-life drawing techniques.

ART232 Drawing II

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART231 or instructor consent.

Drawing II is where the study of visual language is understood through the manipulation of a wider variety of drawing tools and supports, encouraging an exploration of process and content cohesion. Critiques challenge students to analyze their expressions by addressing issues inherent in visual language. Students are encouraged to begin and sustain the process of self-examination by dealing with diversified subject matter in both objective and non-objective idioms. Both individual and group criticisms, combined with discussions of drawing ideology, expand the students' perceptions of themselves as artists within a historical and contemporary context.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze work created in critiques and discussions utilizing elements of design concerning issues of form and content in one's work
  2. Create drawings of increased scale and utilize techniques learned when approaching large scale formatting and rendering.
  3. Demonstrate increasing command of materials and techniques used in large scale drawing exercises
  4. Demonstrate the ability to draw from life with increasingly advanced skill in hand-eye coordination
  5. Develop a range of both traditional and innovative medium choices in developing a variety of scale in drawing projects
  6. Evaluate strengths and weaknesses in one's work and make changes accordingly
  7. Generate drawing ideas using formal and conceptual strategies with increasing independence
  8. Plan and develop a drawing using portraiture techniques with the use of proportion, scale, anatomy, structure, emotion, and style
  9. Situate one's work in an increasingly broad historical and contemporary art context of various drawing techniques
  10. Utilize background, middle ground, foreground and landscape compositions
  11. Utilize increasingly complex methods of rendering space and composition with advanced perspective techniques.

ART233 Drawing III

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART232 or instructor consent.

Drawing III where the study of visual language is understood through the manipulation and the expansion of tools and materials used in the drawing medium. Drawing III addresses the issues dealing with the refinement of a portfolio that concentrates on the students' personal vision. In addition to previous drawing course objectives, Drawing III students study contemporary and historical art issues, cultural references, art genres, mixed media approaches, and color. Students in this course are expected to articulate outcomes and processes of their drawings through critiques to create a body of work.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze own work with increasingly clear and convincing statements using elements of design in critiques and discussions about issues of form and content in your work
  2. Demonstrate the ability to draw from life with convincing use of value structure
  3. Employ increasing command of techniques, materials and experimentation in extended drawing projects
  4. Evaluate and identify cultural references in your drawing projects
  5. Generate drawing ideas that address several levels of meaning in one's work and clearly verbalize these levels during critiques
  6. ldentify with increasing sophistication and specificy the strengths and weaknesses in one's work and make changes accordingly
  7. Produce drawings that exhibit a range of both traditional, mixed-media assemblage, and color techniques in small and large-scale projects
  8. Relate one's work within broad art history and contemporary contexts that include various drawing modes
  9. Use verbal or written means to support the content and form of the drawing as it pertains to the viewer

ART234 Figure Drawing I

Credits 4Fall/Spring

This course introduces the student to drawing the human form using a live nude model. Students utilize observational drawing techniques to describe the human form: proportion, mass, and structure. Students explore visual language elements of line and value as enhancements to structure, issues in light, perspective, surface anatomy, and essential skeletal structures. Lectures include the history of the figure in art. Students use critical thinking to respond to peer discussions of artworks.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply critical thinking to respond to peer discussions of artworks including historical, cultural, contemporary and student work.
  2. Engage in personal expression, creativity, individuality, and the interpretation of the figure.
  3. Evaluation of body diversity, identity, gender, fashion, history, draping forms, and transformation.
  4. Exploration of anatomical proportions and multicultural ideas of what the human form represents to us.
  5. Utilize drawing methods to describe: volume, mass, structure, line quality, gesture, texture, surface anatomy, elasticity, and scale

ART235 Figure Drawing II

Credits 4Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART234 or instructor consent.

ART235, Life Drawing II, delves deeper into studies of skeletal and muscular structure, and concentrates on the anterior and posterior views of the torso through overlay drawings. Extended studies investigate the potential of the human form as a subject matter. Students explore the figure as a theatrical means of expression including: foreshortening, drastic perspective, metaphors, culture, and history. Students critically respond to readings, images, and artworks to form ideas for their work and the work of others.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Utilize drawing methodologies for structuring the human form in order to sight scale and proportion with increasing personal vision.
  2. Create and analyze representations of the human form under the lens of diverse historical and contemporary culture in the fine arts.
  3. Apply concepts, conventions, and drawing techniques to human expression, philosophy, spirituality, and language.
  4. Draw and describe the skeletal and muscular systems using color media.
  5. Practice the creative drawing process to understand and appreciate human expression.
  6. Evaluate articles, critiques, and discussion groups regarding the human form.
  7. Apply critical thinking in your work, group critiques, and peer discussions.
  8. Utilize the principles and elements of design.

ART236 Figure Drawing III

Credits 4Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART235 or instructor consent.

ART236 Life Drawing III will continue skeletal and musculature studies including overlay drawings of the head, neck, arms and legs. Although students continue to draw directly from the model in class, this course expands beyond the basic form and structure of the figure to discover conceptual, metaphorical and cultural narratives. Students explore mixed-media and develop a personal expression using the theme of the figure.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Create figure drawings with advanced techniques.\\n
  2. Research artists as references that challenge visual and conceptual boundaries of figure drawings.
  3. Build a visual journal or sketchbook that shows the process, work, and techniques of figure drawing.
  4. Research ideas, concepts, images, and artists pertaining to your work.
  5. Analyze the cultural, ethical and art historical merit of one’s work.
  6. Evaluate videos, online media, or reading material regarding the history of the figure for artists.
  7. Apply personal metaphors and concepts within figure drawings.
  8. Develop a body of work for a portfolio.
  9. Utilize critical thinking in your work and be willing to make revisions and changes to it.
  10. Utilize the principles and elements of design.

ART240 Illustration and Cartooning

Credits 4Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: None, however ART231 is recommended.

This course introduces beginners to drawing methods through the lens of commercial cartooning, and Illustration. The course covers single panel cartoons, multiple-panel cartoons, character design, caricatures, story development and illustration. This course introduces students to narrative structure using aspects of drawing and cartooning. Students learn how to take their hand-drawn work into the digital sphere by using Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Students learn contemporary and traditional methods of cartooning and illustration, and how those methods relate.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze historical elements of cartooning and illustration, and how they are reflected in contemporary forms of these processes.
  2. Apply digital methods in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator to digitize hand drawn projects.
  3. Apply knowledge of the elements of drawing and design when applied to cartooning and illustration.
  4. Apply methods of self- and group-evaluation in the form of verbal critique.
  5. Apply vocabulary specific to cartooning and illustration.
  6. Create a multiple-panel cartoon utilizing text and frame progression.
  7. Create a single panel cartoon that emphasizes political or cultural expression.
  8. Draw a caricature that exaggerates the prominent features of the subject and evokes understanding of character emotion.
  9. Use drawing methods to express personal ideas

ART244 Visual Storytelling

Credits 4Winter/Spring

This course introduces the novice to the wide world of graphic novels, zines, and GIF animation. This course takes students through the process of visual storytelling in zine pagination, using paneling and storyboarding to structure narrative, and how to animate a short narrative. Students will learn techniques in analog creation, Adobe digital applications, and storyboarding to create their own narrative form sequential art. No previous experience with digital software is needed. Students learn how to apply narrative structures in both fiction and non-fiction, while using image and text relationships. Students study the history of graphic novels, zines and animation and their impact on contemporary artists using these methods.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze how all forms of visual storytelling can reflect and critique current events.
  2. Analyze the history of visual storytelling in graphic novels, self-publishing, and GIF animation.
  3. Apply digital methods where applicable in Adobe Photoshop to edit hand drawn comics and generated animation.
  4. Apply methods of self- and group-evaluation in the form of verbal critique.
  5. Apply vocabulary specific to the forms of graphic novels, zines and animation.
  6. Create a 2 page comic utilizing text and frame progression.
  7. Create a short-form GIF animation using Adobe Photoshop.
  8. Participate in a class webcomic blog.
  9. Use Adobe InDesign to create a zine printed in small edition.
  10. Use drawing methods to express personal ideas and analyze current cultural influences.
  11. Utilize narrative forms in all sequential projects.
  12. Utilize the elements of drawing and design when applied to graphic novels, zines, and animation.

ART254 Ceramics I

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Introduces a variety of forming and finishing techniques used in working with clay and glaze, with an emphasis on the vessel. Hand building, wheel throwing, surface alteration, glazing, overview of ceramic history, elements and principles of design, aesthetics, and studio safety will be investigated. This introductory course is designed for the student with limited or no previous experience in ceramics.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply knowledge of ceramic materials to create both utilitarian and conceptual ceramic forms.
  2. Demonstrate the proper use of ceramics tools and techniques to develop finished ceramics pieces.
  3. Interpret historical ceramic techniques, methods, and forms through contemporary methods.
  4. Apply the elements and principles of design to create finished ceramic pieces.
  5. Apply various methods of decorating pottery pieces by employing texture, slip application, and glazing techniques.
  6. Participate in and develop a process of self-examination of his/her own work
  7. Apply important terms and concepts in the evaluation of ceramics.

ART255 Ceramics II

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART254.

Students participate in an in-depth study of skill-building techniques, materials, tools, design, firing and glaze applications. Further visual literacy is developed through continuing study and application of the principles and elements of design. Students utilize various techniques of decorating and glazing, and the evaluation of student and historical vessels. Emphasis is on the implementation of design elements and their application to pottery form. Decorating, glazing, kiln firing and glaze firing theory will be covered. This course is for the student with previous pottery/ceramics training.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Utilize skill building techniques, materials, tools, design and glaze applications
  2. Demonstrate skill building techniques through practice in hand building and/or wheel throwing
  3. Apply knowledge of ceramics history, elements of design, form, and function as related to ceramics media.
  4. Demonstrate various methods of decorating pottery pieces by employing slip application and glazing techniques.
  5. Demonstrate basic knowledge of loading, firing, and unloading kilns.
  6. Demonstrate use of basic glaze materials, mixing, and testing.
  7. Apply important terms and concepts involved in the analysis of ceramics as an art form.
  8. Participate in and develop a process of examination of own work

ART256 Ceramics III

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART255.

This course is for the serious ceramics student with previous pottery/ceramics training in both throwing and hand-building techniques. Students are expected to demonstrate a proficiency in clay manipulation, sound development of vessel form, and surface design. Students learn to understand and recognize the role of visual and conceptual elements as they affect structure and form. They have the opportunity to evaluate various clay bodies, experiment with and test glaze formulations and participate in firing the glaze kilns. ART254, ART255 and ART256 are sequential courses.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply previously learned skills in project selection and development.
  2. Apply results of test glaze formulations and the firing of the glaze kilns.
  3. Design and produce a large (over 20") stand-alone art vessel that displays an understanding of the principles of design, structure and three-dimensional form.
  4. Design and produce a set (group of different, yet related, vessel forms that function as a unit) of utilitarian pots
  5. Evaluate and understand pottery materials in the various stages of completion
  6. Evaluate the end product by interacting with other students, instructor and self-critique
  7. Apply the pre-planning process prior to construction of designs
  8. lnterpret the relationship between positive and negative space and how they relate to light
  9. Perform a higher degree of proficiency by repeating the same form, presenting it in varying sizes (production work)
  10. Interpret how their work relates to art history and/or trends in contemporary art.

ART257 Jewelrymaking/Metalsmithing I

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

This introductory course, designed for the student with limited or no previous jewelry/metalsmithing experience, is a combination of applied design principles of an art class and metalsmithing/jewelry as an art medium. This course develops student design awareness and develops sound, step-by-step metals technique, design application, craftsmanship skills and expertise in the use of power equipment and hand tools related to art metal. Students become familiar with technical processes used by the professional jeweler and practicing artisan.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply and develop aesthetic concepts of form, line and space to metalsmithing projects from a conceptual drawing
  2. Demonstrate and synthesize fundamental abilities with metalsmithing tools, materials, and processes while exhibiting basic safety habits in order to create small sculpture, functional objects and jewelry
  3. Develop critical abilities, both as a maker and as an observer, through critical discussion, teacher evaluation and self evaluation
  4. Explain fundamental visual and aesthetic concepts through critical discussions while exploring the difference between functional and non-functional designs using appropriate vocabulary, and demonstrate a beginning level of self-expression in metal
  5. Identify historical and contemporary influences within the fìeld of artistic metalsmithing

ART258 Jewelrymaking/Metalsmithing II

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART257.

This course continues the study of applied design principles in metalsmithing and jewelrymaking, emphasizing original designs. Students continue to learn manipulative skills with hand tools and power equipment related to more advanced technical processes. Discussions of jewelry/art metal and how it relates to fashion design, as well as historical and contemporary implications are included. Students considering a career in the jewelry and metalsmithing trades receive practical guidelines for pursuing their profession.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply historical traditions and contemporary influences into metalsmithing projects
  2. Communicate visual and aesthetic concepts through critical discussion using appropriate vocabulary
  3. Demonstrate an intermediate ability to use metalsmithing processes to create small sculptures or jewelry objects
  4. Demonstrate an intermediate ability with metalsmithing tools, materials, and processes while continuing to exhibit safety habits
  5. Develop critical abilities, both as a maker and as an observer, through critical discussion, teacher evaluation and self evaluation
  6. Develop small-scale sculptural or functional objects from a series of conceptual drawings
  7. Synthesize abilities with tools, materials, processes, influences, concepts, and designs to demonstrate an intermediate level of self-expression in metal
  8. Use more advanced applications of the aesthetic issues of form, line and space, to metalsmithing projects

ART259 Jewelrymaking/Metalsmithing III

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART258.

Third-term students build on the skills acquired in the two preceding terms and are allowed more latitude in project selections, which incorporate several required advanced metalsmithing techniques. Students implement strategies in transferring applied design elements, manipulating tools and fabricating materials to help develop an insight on the process in order to successfully complete select areas of study. Students discuss and critique each other's work and discuss basic aesthetics of art metal design and construction, thus expanding the student's perception of themselves within a historical as well as contemporary context.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply advanced issues of form, line and space to the content of their metalsmithing projects designed using well-defined, aesthetic principles
  2. Communicate visual and aesthetic concepts by leading group critiques addressing their personal projects
  3. Demonstrate an advanced ability to integrate more complex metalsmithing techniques while continuing to exhibit safety habits
  4. Design more conceptually sophisticated small-scale sculptural and functional objects from a series of drawings
  5. Explain specifically where historical traditions and contemporary influences are integrated into their metalsmithing projects

ART260 Digital Photography and Imaging

Credits 4Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090 or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels.

This beginning digital photography course introduces the use of digital cameras and software for digital image processing and management. Students learn the fundamentals of exposure, composition, lighting and basic processing techniques for output to Web or external print services. Students are also introduced to software applications for image organization, adjustment and management. In addition to technical camera operation, students will be introduced to basic design principles along with historical context related to each photographic assignment. Technique and conceptual thinking will be emphasized.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Achieve images with proper aperture, shutter speed, and ISO combinations as well as be able to differentiate between situations calling for motion control or shallow depth of field
  2. Demonstrate and apply basic knowledge of white balance and color temperature when creating an image
  3. Demonstrate competent operation of a camera in manual and program modes
  4. Employ basic image processing skills such as tonal curves, cropping, and resizing
  5. Evaluate, demonstrate, and discuss various visual strategies of photographic composition
  6. Organize digital files using image database software
  7. Develop and analyze ways to solve aesthetic and conceptual problems using a variety of photographic strategies
  8. Understand how photographs are contextualized in contemporary and historical photographic issues, genres and concerns.

ART261 Photography I

Credits 3Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090 or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. Adjustable film camera is necessary.

This beginning black and white film photography class emphasizes visual and technical proficiency using 35mm film cameras. Students become adept at in-camera exposure control, lighting, darkroom film processing and printing techniques as well as gain a solid foundation in design and composition.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate competent operation of a 35mm camera in manual mode
  2. Employ basic darkroom printing strategies such as filter use, flashing, burning, and dodging
  3. Evaluate, demonstrate, and discuss various visual strategies of photographic composition
  4. Mount, spot, and prepare prints for exhibition
  5. Properly expose and process 35mm film, and make darkroom prints in the classical style

ART262 Photography II

Credits 3Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: ART261; or instructor consent. Adjustable film camera is necessary.

This intermediate black and white photography course is designed to build proficiency beyond basic camera and darkroom skills. Emphasis is placed on content, exposure, lighting, and darkroom practices that produce high quality images. Students create a photographic essay on a single topic for portfolio use. Advanced photographic processes and techniques are covered.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Actively express the idea of storytelling through images
  2. Demonstrate competency in advanced darkroom printing techniques such as bleaching and toning
  3. Evaluate, demonstrate, and discuss advanced visual and technical strategies in photography
  4. Produce a high quality portfolio of images properly exposed, printed, and mounted for presentation

ART271 Printmaking I: Screenprint and Woodcut

Credits 4Fall/Winter/Spring

This course introduces the beginner to the direct method of image design and transfer to a screen print stencil and woodblock. Students learn to use visual language, symbolism, iconography and to express their ideas. Students study the historical relevance of printmaking and global contemporary community. Students regularly participate in class critiques using printmaking and art terminology, print processes and analysis of visual translation.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply design principles as they relates to printmaking methods
  2. Apply direct drawing on transparencies and wood blocks
  3. Create a series of print editions as required
  4. Create imagery utilizing photo emulsion (screenprint) and carving methods (linoleum and wood)
  5. Demonstrate accurate use of vocabulary specific to printmaking
  6. Demonstrate correct use of registration methods
  7. Develop and utilize image separation and transfer to transparencies and relief blocks
  8. Mix ink for a variety of results, e.g.: viscosity, modifiers and etc.
  9. Practice printing methods, both Western and Eastern
  10. Use relief and screenprinting inking methods
  11. Written or oral analysis of individual work and peer work is completed to show understanding of printmaking processes

ART272 Printmaking II: Silkscreen, Woodcut, and Intaglio

Credits 4Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART271 or instructor consent.

Students explore graphic communication in more advanced relief printing, practice Western and Eastern traditional carving and printing techniques, develop imagery in multiple blocks and continue screen print practices. Students will be introduced to the intaglio methods of drypoint and etching in this second level. As in Printmaking 1, students will use both direct and indirect methods of imagery development. Printmaking 2 students will study the importance of the history of printmaking and how it reflects in our current culture of the graphic image. Students regularly participate in class critiques using printmaking and art terminology, print processes and analysis of visual translation.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze contemporary and historical printmakers and the artist's intentions for their work
  2. Apply design principles as it relates to printmaking
  3. Compose intaglio imagery using hard and soft grounds
  4. Create imagery using both direct and indirect methods for screenprint and woodcut
  5. Create prints in edition with increased complexity
  6. Create prints utilizing intaglio incising techniques
  7. Demonstrate accurate use of complex inking methods
  8. Demonstrate accurate use of vocabulary specific to printmaking
  9. Employ alternate registration methods
  10. Use ferric chloride as an acid bath for intaglio
  11. Written or oral analysis of individual work and peer work is completed to show understanding of printmaking processes

ART273 Printmaking III

Credits 4Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART272 or instructor consent.

The emphasis in Printmaking 3 is to begin a personal exploration of imagery and to choose an area of interest within the scope of printmaking methods. Students may continue to explore the rich visual potential in woodcut, working to perfect their application of Western and Eastern techniques. Students may continue to express their ideas using screen print methods and to explore additional methods in intaglio. Students are introduced to stone lithography during the third level. Students regularly participate in class critiques using printmaking and art terminology, print processes and analysis of visual translation.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze contemporary printmakers and intentions of their work
  2. Apply design principles as it relates to printmaking
  3. Create a series of editioned images that have a common theme
  4. Create prints in edition with increased complexity
  5. Create prints using methods of lithography
  6. Demonstrate accurate use of vocabulary specific to printmaking
  7. Demonstrate techniques of increased complexity in woodcut, intaglio and screenprint methods
  8. Design imagery using a variety of matrix processes
  9. Written and oral analysis of individual work and peer work is completed to analyze understanding of printmaking processes,

ART281 Painting I

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

The primary concerns of this beginning course are: the interaction of color, value, brushstroke, paint application, surface, composition, scale, pictorial balance, emphasis, and spatial depth. First, students explore mixing paint and color theory. Then, students explore different styles, painting applications, and techniques through observation including: impasto, glazing, grisaille, washes, scumble, dry-brush, realism, expressionism, and impressionism. Critical thinking is developed through individual and group critiques. These concepts, combined with discussions of painting ideology, critical analysis and study of practicing artists, are designed to expand students' creative voice within a historical and contemporary context.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compose paintings as a creative process using one of the traditional painting medias (acrylics) and the tools, solvents and mediums used in their easel painting application
  2. Create paintings that work with the concepts of color mixing, reading color and quality (hue, value, temperature, intensity, translucency and opacity). Utilize color theory to explore color interaction and to expand visual and emotional expression.
  3. Demonstrate original thinking by synthesizing painting media with personal ideas/concepts that create original outcomes
  4. Determine how painting has enriched and changed society and culture
  5. Develop critical thinking skills and use them in discussions and critiques of their paintings and the paintings of others
  6. Explore philosophies and different cultures that provoked and stimulated diverse painting styles and become familiar with vocabulary associated with these styles and the painting medium
  7. Form the illusion of three dimensions, depth, space, and volume on a two dimensional plane using value, overlap, atmospheric perspective, texture, proportion, scale, weight, and color shift
  8. ldentify compositional issues as they relate to structural arrangement of the visual elements and their inter-related dynamics
  9. Manipulate one of the above media (and tools) in the formation of visual images and surface effects

ART282 Painting II

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART281. ART231 is recommended.

Course objectives are to: learn a higher mastery of the tools and materials of traditional and contemporary easel painting techniques; achieve a theoretical understanding of intermediate color theory, interaction and perception; and apply the above to the processes of painting. Critical thinking is developed through both individual and group critiques addressing the integration of form with content. Students explore diversified subject matter in both objective and non-objective idioms. Projects are designed to develop further painting techniques, employ mixed media, stimulate individual solutions, personal directions, and experimental approaches.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply color theory to depict emotion, ambiance, depth, and create a broader personal palette
  2. Compose paintings as a creative process that depicts complex forms from life and hybrid modalities using photographs, digital images, photo transfer, and collage
  3. Employ the fundamental visual elements and the principles of design, as well as exhibit technical competence in completed paintings
  4. Enhance understanding of scale, magnification, and proportions with measuring tools, rulers, grids, and math ratios
  5. Evaluate their own paintings and the paintings of others in contemporary, historic, or diverse cultural artworks by participating in verbal and written critiques or by writing a critical analysis
  6. Identify strengths and weaknesses in one's work and make changes accordingly
  7. Increase sensitivity to alternative surfaces, materials, and consider materials as they relate to technique, concept, and personal practice and become proficient in the use and care of those materials
  8. Interpret the human experience using visual metaphor to critically analyze values and ethics in our global and local community.
  9. Plan and develop original ideas for content and successfully communicate content through the painting medium
  10. Research and broaden their knowledge of the origins and influences of contemporary, modern, and antique artists from non-western and western culture/art

ART283 Painting III

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART282. Recommended ART231.

Students address fundamental issues of contemporary painting that include abstraction, narratives, mixed media, and hybridity. Social and environmental issues are addressed through projects. Critical thinking is developed through both individual and group critiques addressing the integration of form with content. Students are encouraged to create a body of work using the process of self-exploration and self-examination by dealing with diversified subject matter in objective and non-objective idioms. Both individual and group criticisms, combined with discussions of painting ideology expand the students' perceptions of themselves as artists within a cultural, historical, and contemporary context.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Articulate a personal exploration of painting that demonstrates original thinking through painting assignments, lectures and discussions
  2. Broaden sensitivity to color theory and surface effects to express emotion and describe image content
  3. Build a journal of criteria for judging a painting and employ critical thinking to your work and the works of others in historic/contemporary periods and world cultures
  4. Compose paintings exploring personal themes, subjects, and narratives using art historical references, that explore how painting has enriched, influenced, or changed society and culture
  5. Create expanded personal forms and ideas through a range of painting styles (idioms) that explore different ways you perceive the world
  6. Incorporate mixed media, alternative processes, collage, and xerox transfer into painting practices
  7. Investigate personal direction, experimental approaches, and individual approaches to painting construction, revision, and methodology in an effort to form a future painting practice and body of work
  8. ldentify further strengths and weaknesses in one's work and make changes accordingly
  9. Utilize a repeated system of abstraction using patterns, grids, ratios, paint applications, measurements, and mixed/media
  10. Use math ratios and proportions to enlarge an image and to form facial features, symmetry, and structure
  11. Using visual metaphor compare and contrast values and ethics in an evolving local and global community

ART291 Sculpture I

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: None, but ART117 is recommended.

Sculptural processes including abstract and representational modeling, portraiture modeling, silicon rubber mold-making, metal casting, kiln-formed glass casting, glass fusing, glass slumping and 3D printing are taught alongside contemporary sculptural concepts of form and content. Using materials such as plaster, ceramics (clay), wax, silicon rubber, casting plastic, casting foam, casting glass, paper and wire, students learn how material and process interrelate to create form. Students are given an introduction to sculptural ideas and history with a view toward developing a personal form of expression. Studio work is supplemented with practical demonstrations, image lectures, field trips and critical discussions.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze 'accidents' within the sculptural process as possible avenues for exploration
  2. Create sculptures using materials such as plaster, ceramics (clay), wa,X silicon rubber, glass, foam, paper, wire and metal.
  3. Develop a sculpture from concept to three-dimensional form using drawings as working aids
  4. Discover how material and process interrelate to create form
  5. Explore sculptural considerations and their application to sculptural forms including: portraiture, form, space, negative space, surface, material, process and concept
  6. Participate in the assessment of their own sculptural forms and those of others
  7. Participate verbally in critical discussion of sculptural work using appropriate vocabulary
  8. Recognize how personal, cultural and historical influences affect the making of sculptural forms
  9. Safely use sculptural tools and materials and understand their application to particular processes

ART292 Sculpture II

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART291.

This intermediate-level sculpture course is an introduction to the constructive techniques of the lost-wax metal casting process (bronze and aluminum), kiln form glass casting process, the figurative sculpture process and their applications to sculptural ideas and forms. Students are encouraged to continue developing their process-oriented technical skills learned from beginning in a variety of media. The development of a personal sculptural aesthetic is emphasized. Studio work is supplemented with practical demonstrations, slide lectures, field trips and critical discussions.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Communicate visual concepts through critical discussion using appropriate vocabulary
  2. Create sculptures using materials such as plaster, clay, wood, foam, wa,X silicon rubber, paper, wire, metal (aluminum, bronze) and casting glass
  3. Develop a sculpture from concept to three-dimensional form using drawings and maquettes as working aids
  4. Discover how material, process and concept interrelate to create form
  5. Employ 'accidents' within the sculptural process as part of the process
  6. Explore sculptural considerations and their application to sculptural forms including: the human figure, form, space, negative space, surface, material, process, concept, time and context
  7. Explore self-expression through the synthesis of tool use, materials, processes, influences and concepts that comprise a sculptural form
  8. lncorporate personal, cultural and historical influences in the making of sculptural forms
  9. Participate in the assessment of his/her sculptural forms and those of others
  10. Safely use sculptural tools and materials and understand their application to particular processes

ART293 Sculpture III

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ART292

This course is an advanced study of sculptural form, space and content. Students are introduced to figurative sculptural processes, kiln-formed glass casting processes, sculptural installation concepts. Working independently, students explore their own creative philosophy while sculpting in any medium including metal, wood, glass, ceramic, found objects, mixed media and digital. This course is also a continuation of the casting processes, with instruction in mold-making and casting techniques for bronze, aluminum and glass. Studio work is supplemented with practical demonstrations, slide lectures, field trips and critical discussions.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Communicate visual concepts through critical discussion using appropriate vocabulary
  2. Create sculptures demonstrating advanced sculptural processes and concepts including using metal casting processes and installations (site-specific, time-based, and multi-media)
  3. Develop a sculpture from concept to three-dimensional form by applying their own sculptural aesthetic and utilizing the tools, materials, processes, influences and concepts which comprise a sculptural form
  4. Discern their own sculptural aesthetic from that of others including evaluating preconceived ideas of what constitutes a 'successful' versus an 'unsuccessful' aesthetic form
  5. Discover how material, process and concept interrelate to create form and space
  6. Employ 'accidents' within the sculptural process as part of the process
  7. Explore sculptural considerations and their application to sculptural forms including: form, space, negative space, surface, material, process, concept, time, context, audience, performance, philosophy/spirituality and installation
  8. Incorporate personal, cultural and historical influences in the making of sculptural forms
  9. Participate in the assessment of their own sculptural forms and those of others
  10. Safely use and create sculptural tools and materials and understand their application to particular processes

ART294 Watercolor I

Credits 4Spring

This course introduces the tools and techniques of the luminous medium of watercolor. Students explore basic transparent watercolor techniques and their applications. Emphasis is placed on the technical uses of water media utilizing composition, color theory, color mixing, and the principles and elements of design. Critical thinking is developed through individual and group critiques as well as discussions. Students explore imagery that includes narrative illustration, still-life, landscape, figurative/character development, abstraction, and self-exploration.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply knowledge of water media to describe, synthesize, interpret, and analyze cultural/historical techniques, imagery, and their significance.
  2. Develop complete compositions using fundamental application of design principles and elements.
  3. Discuss and critique their own paintings and the paintings of others, including historical and contemporary artworks using critical thinking skills and art vocabulary.
  4. Explore fine arts process of color mixing in the application of transparent watercolor media, alternative water-based media, and drawing media.
  5. Explore the changing role of watercolor through the history of human expression, spirituality, and communication.
  6. Form the illusion of space, depth, volume, and three dimensions on a two-dimensional plane using value, overlap, atmospheric perspective, texture, and color shift.
  7. Identify the watercolor techniques that include: wet-into-wet, flat wash, graduated wash, dry brush, spatter, and line.
  8. Use transparent watercolor media in the execution of various subject matter, compositions, and styles.

ART296 Watercolor II

Credits 4Spring

Registration Requirement: ART294.

This is a course in watercolor painting that further explores transparent watercolor and its combination with other materials such as fabrics and painted papers as a means of expression and communication.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate a more advanced use of transparent watercolor paints in concert with other materials such as crayons, pencils, gouache, casein, acrylic paint inks, fabrics and painted papers to perform a more expressive and communicative application of their possible techniques
  2. Demonstrate a more advanced application of composition, design principles and visual elements by means of combining transparent watercolor with other materials
  3. Demonstrate a more advanced application of color theory and color mixing by means of combining transparent watercolor with other materials
  4. Demonstrate a more advanced application of transparent watercolor with other materials in the execution of works within various studio situations
  5. Evaluate their own paintings and the paintings of others' by participating in verbal and written critiques or by writing a critical analysis
  6. Identify strengths and weaknesses in one's work and make changes accordingly
  7. Increase sensitivity to alternative surfaces, materials, and consider materials as they relate to technique, concept, and personal practice and become proficient in the use and care of those materials

ART297 Watercolor III

Credits 4Spring

Registration Requirement: ART296.

This advanced level class explores the creative potential of water-based media. The course includes experimental uses of non-traditional watercolor materials and their expressive potential. Students develop an extended personalized palette. They work independently under the direction of the instructor who encourages an individual direction in choices of subject matter, technique and materials. A primary goal of the course is the creation of a body of mature work suitable for portfolio presentation.

This course fulfills: Arts & Letters; Human Relations

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate a more advanced use of the media of transparent & opaque watercolor paints in concert with other materials such as crayons, pencils, gouache, casein, acrylic paint, inks, fabrics and painted papers to perform a more expressive and communicative application of their possible techniques
  2. Demonstrate a more advanced application of composition, design principles and visual elements by means of combining transparent watercolor with other materials
  3. Demonstrate a more advanced application of color theory and color mixing by means of combining transparent watercolor with other materials; the advanced student is expected to use selected color families to emote specific responses
  4. Demonstrate a more advanced application of transparent watercolor with other materials in the execution of works within various studio situations
  5. Produce a series of mature work built around an individually chosen theme that demonstrates original thinking using transparent and opaque watercolor with other materials
  6. Evaluate their own paintings and the paintings of others by participating in verbal and written critiques or by writing a critical analysis
  7. Identify strengths and weaknesses in one's work and make changes accordingly
  8. Using visual metaphor in aqueous media, compare and contrast values and ethics in an every-changing community.

Course offered online

Cultural Literacy course