Sociology major

mhcc.edu/SocialScience

Faculty Adviser

Dr. Naomi Abrahams: 503-491-7604 | Room AC2670 | Naomi.Abrahams@mhcc.edu

Sociology is the study of group influence on human behavior. Sociology promotes an understanding of the social structures that create, maintain and transform societies. Sociology connects the experience of the individual to both micro and macro dimensions of group life. Students of sociology will engage in community work and connect their academic learning to social praxis. A bachelor’s degree in sociology provides an excellent liberal arts foundation for embarking on a wide range of career paths.

Curricular Outcomes

At the completion of this curriculum, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of key sociological concepts and apply them to the real world
  • Understand the connection between the individual and the broader society
  • Describe major theoretical paradigms and methodological approaches of sociology
  • Apply sociological concepts, principles, and methodologies to contemporary social problems and other sociological phenomenon
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and social phenomena to social and community issues
  • Critically analyze contemporary social institutions
  • Critically analyze systems of inequality and promote social understanding

Students interested in pursuing the Sociology major can complete the following courses toward the Social Science requirement and/or electives on the AAOT (recommended), AS, AGS or ASLA degrees. Admitted students may also log on to Navigate to start the process of building an academic plan based on this major and can notify an adviser for review.

Sociology courses that transfer to most public Oregon universities as Sociology credit

SOC204General Sociology: Principles of Sociology (Course offered online)3
SOC205General Sociology: Social Institutions (Course offered online)3
SOC206General Sociology: Social Problems (Course offered online)3
SOC213Race Relations in the United States (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)3

Sociology courses that  fulfill the social science requirement at MHCC and may transfer as elective or social science credit to public Oregon universities

SOC215Gender and Society (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)3
SOC216Sociology of the Family (Course offered online)3
SOC223Sociology of Aging (Course offered online)3

Transfer Schools

The following shows just one example of how students can complete an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree while also taking lower-division sociology courses. Be sure to work with an MHCC adviser and the transfer institution you'd like to attend to ensure correct courses are being taken. Not all courses are offered every term. Click on a course number to see what term(s) the course is typically offered.

Plan of Study Grid
First QuarterCredits
SOC204 General Sociology: Principles of Sociology (Course offered online) 3
WR121 English Composition (Course offered online) 4
MTH105 Mathematics in Society (or higher) 5
Sociology elective / university requirement 3-4
 Credits16
Second Quarter
SOC205 General Sociology: Social Institutions (Course offered online) 3
WR122
English Composition: Critical Thinking (Course offered online)
or Technical Report Writing (Course offered online)
4
Oral Communication 3-4
Sociology elective / university requirement 4
 Credits15
Third Quarter
Arts & Letters 3-4
Health & Physical Education 3
Science / Math / Computer Science 3-5
Social Science (other than Sociology) 3-4
 Credits16
Fourth Quarter
SOC213 Race Relations in the United States (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course) 3
Arts & Letters 3-4
Lab Science 3-5
Sociology elective / university requirement 4
 Credits15
Fifth Quarter
Arts & Letters 3-4
Lab Science 3-5
Sociology electives / university requirements 8
 Credits16
Sixth Quarter
Lab Science 3-5
Sociology electives / university requirements 8
 Credits12
 Total Credits90

SOC204 General Sociology: Principles of Sociology (Course offered online)

Credits 3Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course focuses on sociology as a science and examines sociological research methods and theories of social structure, status, roles, groups, organizations, culture, socialization, gender, social stratification, racial and ethnic relations.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate comprehension of the major sociological perspectives which include structural functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interactions
  2. Describe the key components and basic sociological concepts used in understanding culture, socialization and human behavior
  3. Identify the impact of status positions, role behavior, and social stratification as it relates to the contemporary social structure
  4. Identify the major scientific methodologies used by sociologists in examining human behavior within the social structure

SOC205 General Sociology: Social Institutions (Course offered online)

Credits 3Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. This course contains an optional service-learning component. Volunteer placement assistance will be provided.

The basic findings of sociology concerning social institutions and factors of social change are examined in this course. Particular focus is placed on transformations in institutions such as the family, economy, politics, and education resulting from global capitalism, rationalization and technological change. Students engage in community work and analyze the meaning of community in contemporary U.S. society. Students develop critical thinking skills in analyzing reports of human behavior using statistics. The relationship between the individual and large-scale organization of institutions is explored.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Critique statistical reports of human behavior
  2. Describe and analyze the relationship between the individual and large scale insitutions
  3. Discuss the ways in which roles are impacted by the organization of social institutions
  4. Explain and criticize a variety of sociological perspectives concerning the nature and organization of social institutions and community

SOC206 General Sociology: Social Problems (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. This course contains an optional service-learning component. Volunteer placement assistance will be provided.

This course examines contemporary social problems and their impact on society. Emphasis is placed upon sociological explanations and policy solutions to contemporary social problems. In addition, sociological perspectives concerning the processes by which certain conditions come to be defined as social problems are explored.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and identify the variety of sociological perspectives used in explaining the evolution of social problems
  2. Identify key social factors that characterize a social problem
  3. Identify policy, practices or actions that influence the continuation, correction, alteration or eradication of the major components of the social problem
  4. Participate in a community based organization designed to address a social problem

SOC213 Race Relations in the United States (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 3Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course examines race relations in the United States sociologically. Emphasis is placed upon basic sociological concepts used to examine historical and contemporary dimensions of race. Included among these concepts are: power, social class, self concept, social interaction, institutional discrimination and social structure. This course will answer the following questions: What is race? How and why is race constructed in particular ways in the U.S.? How does the cultural meaning of race change?.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze contemporary social constructions of race in the United States
  2. Discuss and appraise basic sociological concepts and theories of race relations in the American context
  3. Explain the ways in which power relations are relevant to race in the United States
  4. Identify intersectionality of race with other systems of inequality such as gender and class

SOC215 Gender and Society (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

Sociological perspectives on gender are examined in this course. In particular, the social construction of gender is explored in relation to identity, interaction and social institutions. The course content is organized around the following questions: What is gender? How does gender influence the organization of families, economies and states? In what ways is gender related to power and violence? How does gender impact identity, intimacy and friendship?.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze the connection between macro and micro levels of social life as they relate to gender inequality. In particular, identify the connection between identity, interaction and social structure as they relate to gender
  2. Explain the gender dynamics of particular social institutions including: the family, the economy, the state, and education.
  3. Describe sociological perspectives of gender and sexuality.
  4. Describe the intersection of gender with other structural systems such as: race, class, ethnicity, sexuality.

SOC216 Sociology of the Family (Course offered online)

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course is designed to examine the family as a social institution. The course explores the relationship between family forms and shifts in the economy. In addition, the course considers power relations embedded in families as well as diversity in families in the U.S. Finally, the course explores the family as it relates to the life course from childhood to partnership to parenthood of the elderly and their families.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze the relationship between social change and family structure
  2. Describe diversity in U.S. family structures
  3. Describe kinship patterns as they relate to U.S. families historically
  4. Describe life-course issues as they relate to the family
  5. Identify power relations in families

SOC223 Sociology of Aging (Course offered online)

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels; SOC204 is recommended.

The sociological and cultural aspects of aging in contemporary American society are studied in this introductory course. The lifelong process of aging is examined from psychological, biological and sociological perspectives. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to describe key sociological theories and concepts of aging. In addition, students will be able to identify and apply strategies for working with older adults.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the procedures involved in death, dying and bereavement
  2. Discuss the importance of social supports, the family friends and neighbors
  3. Explain the social consequences of biological and psychological aging
  4. Identify and explain differing theories of aging
  5. Identify and explain the factors which are responsible for the growth of an aging population
  6. Identify the characteristics of populations at risk, i.e., older minorities, older women

SOC298 Sociology Research

Credit 1

Registration Requirement: Instructor permission required. Student will be advised to have either completed SOC204 or have concurrent registration in SOC206.

This course develops skills in community-based research and social policy analysis. The student will engage in academic research as well as community work in order to analyze a particular social justice issue. The student will investigate social policy research on his or her particular issue and develop policy recommendations.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply knowledge of human behavior and social phenomenon to social and community issues
  2. Apply sociological concepts to contemporary social problems
  3. Apply sociological methodologies at an introductory level to developing an understanding of particular sociological phenomenon

Course offered online

Cultural Literacy course