History major

mhcc.edu/SocialScience

Faculty Adviser

Elizabeth Milliken: 503 491-7127 | Room AC2679 | Elizabeth.Milliken@mhcc.edu

History majors systematically observe and document the past. A history degree can lead to a career teaching history, or to founding or managing a business, or reporting the news, or managing an archive, or government, law and other professions. Corporate management trainers report liberal arts majors advance further in business careers than students with other majors, and recent figures show that students majoring in history score especially well in entrance examinations for Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs and law school.

Curricular Outcomes

At the completion of this curriculum, students should be able to:

  • Identify and analyze major events and developments of significant cultures and civilizations, and the interrelationships of selected social, cultural, political, economic and geographic systems
  • Recognize the effects of historical events upon subsequent issues, and situations and different interpretations of historical events
  • Demonstrate basic competence in and discuss the effects of geography upon historical events
  • Use basic tools of historical inquiry - especially the practice of finding evidence, weighing its importance and validity and applying it to a historical problem

Students interested in pursuing the History major can complete the following courses toward the Social Science requirement or electives on the ASLA (recommended), AAOT, AS, or AGS degrees. Admitted students may also log on to Navigate to start the process of building an academic plan based on this major and can notify an adviser for review.

MHCC History Courses that Transfer as History Credit to Oregon Public Universities

HST101Western Civilization: Ancient and Classical Europe (Cultural Literacy course)4
HST102Western Civilization: Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Cultural Literacy course)4
HST103Western Civilization: Modern Europe (Cultural Literacy course)4
HST110Ancient World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)4
HST111Medieval World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)4
HST112Modern World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)4
HST201U.S. History: Pre-Colonial-1840 (Course offered online)4
HST202U.S. History: 1840 - 1917 (Course offered online)4
HST203U.S. History: 1910 - Present (Course offered online)4
HST264African-American History: 1500 - 1870s (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)4
HST265African-American History: 1870 - Present (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)4

Other MHCC History Electives

HST195History of the Vietnam War (Cultural Literacy course)3
HST237America in the 1960s3
HST204Women in U.S. History (Cultural Literacy course)4
HST225Women in World History (Cultural Literacy course)4

Professional Associations and Transfer Schools

The following shows just one example of how students can complete an AS in Liberal Arts degree while also taking lower-division history courses. Be sure to work with an MHCC adviser and the transfer institution you'd like to attend to ensure correct courses are being taken. Not all courses are offered every term. Click on a course number to see what term(s) the course is typically offered.

Plan of Study Grid
First QuarterCredits
HST110
Ancient World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)
or Western Civilization: Ancient and Classical Europe (Cultural Literacy course)
or U.S. History: Pre-Colonial-1840 (Course offered online)
4
WR121 English Composition (Course offered online) 4
Oral Communication 3-4
Modern Language 101 4-5
 Credits15
Second Quarter
HST111
Medieval World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)
or Western Civilization: Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Cultural Literacy course)
or U.S. History: 1840 - 1917 (Course offered online)
4
WR122
English Composition: Critical Thinking (Course offered online)
or Technical Report Writing (Course offered online)
4
MTH105 Mathematics in Society (or higher) 5
Modern Language 102 4-5
 Credits17
Third Quarter
HST112
Modern World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)
or Western Civilization: Modern Europe (Cultural Literacy course)
or U.S. History: 1910 - Present (Course offered online)
4
Modern Language 103 4-5
Electives / university requirements 6-8
 Credits15
Fourth Quarter
Arts & Letters (other than Modern Language) 3-4
Modern Language 201 4-5
Electives / university requirements 6-8
 Credits15-16
Fifth Quarter
Science / Math / Computer Science 3-5
Social Science (other than History) 3-4
Modern Language 202 4-5
Elective / university requirement 3-4
 Credits15-17
Sixth Quarter
Health & Physical Education 3
Modern Language 203 4-5
Electives / university requirements 6-8
 Credits13-14
 Total Credits90-94

HST101 Western Civilization: Ancient and Classical Europe (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

HST101 is an introductory survey of European history from its earliest civilizations to circa 1000 C.E. in the early medieval era. Topics to be covered include the Paleolithic and early Neolithic eras, and the influence of earlier civilizations such as Mesopotamia, India, Persia and Egypt upon early Europe; the rise of Minoan and Greek civilization; the influence of the Etruscans upon early Rome, the Roman Republic and Empire; the rise of Christianity and the role of the church in Europe; the Barbarian invasions and the emergence of feudalism; the impact of the Eastern Roman or Byzantine empire; the rise of the Frankish kingdoms and Charlemagne; the rise of the Arab Caliphate and Europe's interactions with the Muslim world.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the significant individuals, events and historical issues in Ancient Western Civilization as described in the course description.
  2. Explain the impact of this period of Western Civilization on subsequent developments in European and World History
  3. Analyze historical issues with critical thinking skills
  4. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources
  5. Identify key geographic features of this region and explain their significance to events and developments in this period of history.

HST102 Western Civilization: Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This is an introductory survey course on European History from approximately 1000 to 1750 C.E. Topics include the emergence of early medieval European culture, development of the institutions of Christianity, feudalism and manorialism, and the continuation of Roman institutions in the Eastern Byzantine Empire; the Crusades, the revival of the economy and rediscovery of Classical Roman and Greek culture and learning after 1000 C.E.; the development of European culture during the High Middle Ages and subsequent Renaissance; the emergence of new monarchies and nation states; European global exploration and empire building; the scientific revolution and the beginnings of the Enlightenment.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Define and describe key developments, significant individuals, events and historical issues in European history from approximately 1000 C.E. to 1750 as described in the course description.
  2. Explain the impact of this period of Western Civilization on subsequent developments in European and World History
  3. Analyze historical issues with critical thinking skills
  4. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources
  5. Identify key geographic features of this region and explain their significance to events and developments in this period of history.

HST103 Western Civilization: Modern Europe (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Fall

This is an introductory survey of European history from the French Revolution in the 1780s to the present. Topics to be covered include the collapse of France's monarchy and the upheavals of the French Revolution, Napoleon and his empire, the industrial revolution, Britain's war of rebellion in America, the Revolutions of 1848, the unification of Italy and Germany, European imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Russian Revolution, the Cold War and the rise and fall of Communism, the rise of the European Union and Europe in the 21st century.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Define and describe the key events, individuals, and issues in European history from the late 1700s to the present as described in the course description.
  2. Explain the impact of European history since the late 1700s upon contemporary World.
  3. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources
  4. Identify key geographic features of this region and explain their significance to events and developments in this period of history.

HST110 Ancient World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

HST110 surveys the history of the ancient world from prehistory to approximately 600-700 C.E. Topics include the origins of human civilizations, the development of early Asian, African, American, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and European civilizations, the rise of empires and the emergence of universal religions. There is an emphasis on world geography.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify, describe and analyze key individuals, events and trends in world history from pre-history to approximately 600 - 700 C.E. and analyze key developments in Ancient World History as described in the course description.
  2. Compare and contrast representative cultures from the major cultural zones of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and the Americas.
  3. Explain the impact of this period of world history on subsequent developments in World History.
  4. Analyze historical issues with critical thinking skills.
  5. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources.
  6. Identify key geographic features and explain their significance to events and developments in this period of world history.

HST111 Medieval World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This class surveys the history of the world from the early medieval period (approximately 600 C.E.) to approximately 1750 C.E. Topics include medieval Asian, Middle Eastern, African, American and European civilizations. Topics also include the development and spread of universal religions, the regional and global impact of empires, and increasing global connectedness throughout the period. There is an emphasis on world geography.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify, describe and analyze key individuals, events and trends in world history from approximately 600 C.E. to approximately 1750 CE and analyze key developments in Medieval World History as described in the course description.
  2. Compare and contrast representative cultures from the major cultural zones of Africa, Asia, Europe the Middle East and the Americas
  3. Explain the impact of this period of world history on subsequent world history
  4. Analyze historical issues with critical thinking skills
  5. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources
  6. Identify key geographic features and locate them on a map

HST112 Modern World History (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

HST112 surveys the history of the world from approximately 1750 C.E. to the present. Topics include the development of modern nations and ideologies, world wars, revolutions, social movements, technological and cultural innovation and current global issues. There is an emphasis on world geography.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify, describe and analyze key individuals, events and trends in world history from approximately 1750 C.E. to the present and analyze key developments in Modern World History as described in the course description.
  2. Examine the impact on the cultures of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and the Americas of an increasingly globalized economy and culture
  3. Explain the impact of these historical developments on subsequent history and current global issues
  4. Analyze historical issues with critical thinking skills
  5. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources
  6. Identify key geographic features and explain their significance to events and developments in this period of world history.

HST195 History of the Vietnam War (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This is an introductory survey of the U.S. - Vietnam War, which raged from the end of World War II to 1975. Topics include early Vietnamese history, Vietnam and French imperialism, Vietnam in World War II, the French - Vietnamese War, growing U.S. involvement in the 1950s, the creation of North and South Vietnam, the introduction of U.S. combat troops in the 1960s, the victory of Communist forces in 1975, the impact of the war upon domestic U.S. politics and the role of the Cold War.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the key individuals, events and issues of the U.S. - Vietnam War (1945 - 75)
  2. Describe the significant individuals, events and issues in Vietnamese history from before 1945
  3. Describe the significant individuals, events and issues of the Cold War (1945 - 89)
  4. Explain the impact of the U.S. - Vietnam War upon both contemporary Vietnam and the contemporary United States
  5. Locate significant geographic features of Vietnam and Southeast Asia on a map

HST201 U.S. History: Pre-Colonial-1840 (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

HST201 describes American history starting with the arrival of the first inhabitants in N. America several thousand years ago including: the development of Indian civilizations; the European discovery, invasion and settlement of N. America; the growth of Spanish, French, English and Russian empires in N. America; the struggle with France which made England the dominant world empire in the 1700s; the founding/growth of English colonies ranging from the Caribbean to Canada; the 13 English colonies that united/rebelled against the Mother Country in the 1700s; the American Revolution; the creation of the U.S. Constitution; Robert Gray locating the Columbia River; Oregon's role in early U.S. history; and the era of Andrew Jackson.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the key events, individuals and issues in American history from earliest times to 1840 as described in the course description.
  2. Explain the role and interaction of diverse racial, ethnic and other communities in the development of American History.
  3. Explain the role of Oregon in early American history
  4. Explain the influence of early American history upon the contemporary United States
  5. Describe the impact of key documents such as the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution and in general identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources
  6. Identify key geographic features and explain their significance to events and developments in this period of American history.

HST202 U.S. History: 1840 - 1917 (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course is an introductory survey of United States history from 1840 to 1917. Topics include Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War, growing sectional differences between North and South, the Civil War, Reconstruction, westward migration (with special focus on Oregon and the Oregon Trail), the impact of Native Americans, Populism, Socialism and the Progressive Era, and the beginnings of an overseas American empire.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the key individuals, events and issues in U.S. history from 1840 to 1917 as described in the course description.
  2. Explain the role and interaction of diverse racial, ethnic and other communities in the development of American History.
  3. Describe the role of Oregon in the United States from 1840 to 1917.
  4. Explain the impact of American History from 1840 - 1917 on the contemporary United States.
  5. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources.
  6. Identify key geographic features and explain their significance to events and developments in this period of American history.

HST203 U.S. History: 1910 - Present (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

HST203 is an introductory survey of United States history from the early 1900s to the present. Major topics include World Wars I and II and their impact upon America's homefront, the Great Depression, the Cold War, post-World War II economic and social changes, rise of the Baby Boom, John F. Kennedy and the 1960s, Lyndon Johnson's Great Society, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, the youth movement, Richard Nixon and Watergate, Ronald Reagan and the conservative revival of the 1980s, and the United States in the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the key individuals, events, and issues in U.S. History from 1910 to the present as described in the course description.
  2. Explain the role and interaction of diverse racial, ethnic and other communities in the development of American History.
  3. Analyze the impact of the history of the United States since 1910 upon the contemporary United States.
  4. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources.
  5. Identify key geographic features and explain their significance to events and developments in this period of American history.

HST204 Women in U.S. History (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course surveys the contributions and experiences of women in United States history from the colonial period to the present. It includes examination of the roles of women in diverse ethnic, racial and religious groups within American society. It includes topics such as participation of women in the major events of American history, women's role in major social movements, and the social, legal and political status of women throughout American history.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify and analyze key individuals, events and trends in American women's history from the colonial period to the present
  2. Analyze the economic, political, and social changes that impacted women's roles within the family, in the economy and in the culture
  3. Compare and contrast female experience within diverse cultural traditions, such as African American, Native American, Asian American and European American
  4. Define and identify gender as a category of historical analysis, with some attention to race and class
  5. Explain the impact of women's history on the contemporary United States
  6. Explain the justification for the development of women's history as a field
  7. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources

HST225 Women in World History (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course surveys the contributions and experiences of women of cultures and societies from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Middle East, and examines women's roles in the major global religious traditions, from prehistory to the present. Topics include women's impact on major events in world history and women's participation in social and political movements.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify and analyze selected key individuals, events and trends related to women in world history from pre-history to the present.
  2. Compare and contrast women's roles in the major cultures of the ancient, medieval and modem world: the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas.
  3. Compare and contrast women's roles in the major religious traditions including: Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam.
  4. Define and identify gender as a category of historical analysis
  5. Explain the impact of women's history on the contemporary world
  6. Explain the justification for the development of women's history as a field
  7. Identify, evaluate and analyze credible historical sources

HST237 America in the 1960s

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course explores the convulsive cultural and social forces that defined the United States during the 1960s. Topics include the Civil Rights Movement, rock 'n' roll, image and reality in the Kennedy Administration, the space race and moon landings, the assassinations of JFK, Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy, the Vietnam War, the antiwar movement, the presidencies of Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon, the emergence of a counterculture, the Women's Movement, and the music, literature and films of the era. The course also looks at how the 1960s continue to affect the United States, as well as the rest of the world.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe how the 1960s affected subsequent eras in the United States, including the contemporary United States
  2. Describe the impact of the 1960s upon nations outside the U.S., especially in Europe and S.E. Asia
  3. Describe the key individuals, events and issues in the United States during the 1960s
  4. Explain the significant events in the era leading up to the 1960s, especially from the end of World War II to 1960

HST264 African-American History: 1500 - 1870s (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course surveys African-American history from 1500 to the 1870s. Central themes are the integral role African-Americans have played throughout American history and the impact of African-American history upon the present-day United States. Major topics will include West African civilizations and empires, the Atlantic Slave Trade, European and American justifications for slavery, slavery in Colonial America, African-Americans in the American Revolution, Anti-slavery freedom fighters and slave rebellions, Abolitionism and anti-slavery organizations, The Civil War, and Reconstruction.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

HST265 African-American History: 1870 - Present (Course offered online) (Cultural Literacy course)

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course surveys African-American history from the 1870s to the present. Central themes are the integral role African-Americans have played throughout U.S. history and the impact of African-American history upon the present-day United States. Major topics will include Reconstruction, the Jim Crow Era, The Niagara Movement, the Harlem Renaissance and the 'New Negro,' African-Americans in America's wars, the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, and recent events such as the Presidency of Barack Obama and the Black Lives Matter movement.

This course fulfills: Human Relations; Social Science

HST298 History Research

Credit 1Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. Instructor and dean's signature is required. HST298 is a one-credit class designed to prepare history majors and others for upper division research and report/paper writing. This course may be repeated once.

This course focuses on the skills needed to successfully write a college-level history research paper. It provides a guided experience in library research, planning, and research writing, including correct use of footnotes and bibliography style. Students meet periodically with the instructor, but otherwise work independently to research and write their final 10-page (minimum) paper.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Choose an appropriate, focused topic for historical research
  2. Demonstrate correct use of Chicago Style for attributions and bibliography
  3. Demonstrate effective use of the library and other research sources
  4. Evaluate historical written work of others
  5. Organize and plan a research paper
  6. Write a research paper using proper academic style

Course offered online

Cultural Literacy course