Cybersecurity: Networking and Security Operations - Degree

Associate of Applied Science Degree Programmhcc.edu/Cybersecurity

Faculty Advisers

Dr. Wayne Machuca: 503-491-7631 | Room AC2776 | Wayne.Machuca@mhcc.edu | Students with last name A-F
Katrinia McNeal: 503-491-7502 | Room AC2683 | Katrinia.McNeal@mhcc.edu | Students with last name G-N
Jeff Sperley: 503-491-7357 | Room AC2783 | Jeff.Sperley@mhcc.edu | Students with last name O-Z

Student using a computer

The Cybersecurity and Networking program will both introduce new students and develop existing professionals to the rapidly expanding and important world of Cybersecurity (also known as ’Information Assurance’ or ’Trustworthy Computing’). The design of this program will prepare students to sit for several progressively challenging industry recognized certifications. Students will be exposed to solid hardware and software repair, network development and implementation, various security techniques, perimeter defense, cryptography, business continuity and disaster recovery, and ethical hacking. Students in this program will have opportunity to participate in team competitions against colleges nationwide.

This program is designed to train students for and guide them toward a number of industry recognized certifications such as CCNA, CompTIA, EC-Council and others. This design allows students with no training to work toward recognized skill sets, and will support encumbered and displaced computer technical workers to attain security skills appropriate to enhance their career options.

Career opportunities for Cybersecurity professionals are varied and immediate. The National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) has identified dozens of job titles, which require security skills. Additionally, projections are that by the end of the decade, all or nearly all intermediate level computer technical, developmental or implementation careers will require some level of security training. 

Please note: All core (CIS, ISTM) courses must be completed within 5 years of starting the program.

For success in this program, entering students are recommended to be proficient in basic computer skills. Students without computer experience or who want to brush up on computer skills before beginning this program are encouraged to enroll in BCS090 Computer Basics for College Success, a FREE course offered through the Learning Success Center.

Program Outcomes

At the completion of this program, students should be able to:

  • Perform preventative hardware and software maintenance
  • Troubleshoot and correct computer hardware and software problems
  • Conceptualize, design and diagram possible solutions for a given networking environment
  • Work with others as part of a computer security team
  • Assemble, reconfigure and upgrade personal computers
  • Perform basic network and operating system administration, configuration and system security for both wired and wireless networks
  • Configure and troubleshoot access to resources, hardware devices and drivers, storage use and network connections
  • Analyze Internet security issues and apply them to network design problems
  • Design a disaster recovery plan for a real-world scenario
  • Communicate effectively and professionally in the information technology environment
  • Perform necessary “white hat” attacks on a network to assess vulnerabilities
  • Perform basic computer forensics on a variety of storage medium
  • Design an appropriate risk analysis for a given business in a particular environment

For the most part, courses that fulfill general education requirements can be taken in any term. Students should work with the faculty adviser(s) to create a custom academic plan based on course placement levels, career goals, and full time/part time status.

Admitted students may also log on to Navigate to start the process of building an academic plan based on this major and can notify an adviser for review.

Plan of Study Grid
First Quarter
FallCredits
CIS151 Introduction to Networks 4
ISTM100A Preparation For An Education in I.T. and Cybersecurity 1 (Course offered online) 1
ISTM183C Fundamentals of CyberSecurity 3
WR121 English Composition (Course offered online) 4
Human Relations Requirement 3-4
 Credits15-16
Second Quarter
Winter
CIS125SS Spreadsheets (Course offered online) 3
CIS152 Switching, Routing and Wireless Essentials 4
ISTM100B Preparation For An Education in I.T. and Cybersecurity 2 (Course offered online) 1
ISTM183A Preparation for A+ Essentials 3
ISTM133P Introduction to Python (Course offered online) 4
ISTM283A Fundamentals of Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity (Course offered online) 3
 Credits18
Third Quarter
Spring
CIS153 Enterprise Networking, Security, and Automation 4
ISTM100C Preparation For An Education in I.T. and Cybersecurity 3 (Course offered online) 1
ISTM140L Preparation for Linux+ (Course offered online) 4
ISTM171 Introduction to Cloud and Virtualization Technologies (Course offered online) 3
ISTM183B Preparation for A+ Practical Application (Course offered online) 3
Health and PE Requirement 3
 Credits18
Fourth Quarter
Fall
CIS276 SQL 4
CIS279S Windows Server OS 4
ISTM189 Wireless Security (Course offered online) 3
ISTM283CC Cyber Competition 3
 Credits14
Fifth Quarter
Winter
CIS284S Preparation for Security+ (Course offered online) 4
ISTM283B Firewall Implementation 3
ISTM283CO1 Cyber Operations 1 3
ISTM284E Ethical Hacking 3
Select one programming elective from the following: 3-4
Beginning Game Programming (Course offered online)  
Web Authoring: Client-Side Programming (Course offered online) (offered only in fall)  
Computer Science I  
Mobile Apps 1: Introduction to iOS Mobile Applications Development  
 Credits16-17
Sixth Quarter
Spring
CIS297
Capstone Project Development
or Coop Ed-Computer Applications
4
ISTM233P Python for Cyber Security (Course offered online) 4
ISTM283CO2 Cyber Operations 2 3
Select one of the following: 4-6
Beginning Algebra II (Course offered online)  
Quantitative Reasoning I  
 Credits15-17
 Total Credits96-100

CIS120 Computer Concepts I (Course offered online)

Credits 3Summer/Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels. Recommended co-requisite: CIS120L.

This course discusses computer technology and how this technology is used in business, industry and at home. Emphasis is placed on evaluating work-related and personal situations, and then determining how software and computer based systems can be used to solve the problem. The ethical, social and political implications of current and potential use are discussed. This course, only when in combination with CIS120L, may be considered for direct transfer.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast issues relating to e-mail communications
  2. Compare and contrast issues relating to intellectual property rights
  3. Compare and contrast systems software with applications software
  4. Define computer fluency
  5. Define computer literacy
  6. Describe a computer-based ethical situation and give examples of computer-based solutions to the situation
  7. Enumerate the basic hardware and software requirements necessary to satisfy an entry-level business information need
  8. Evaluate an existing computer system
  9. Evaluate work-related situations and apply computer-based solutions
  10. Identify legal implications of cyber crimes
  11. Identify social and legal implications of corporate computer policies
  12. Solve research questions using a web search engine

CIS120L Computer Concepts Lab I (Course offered online)

Credit 1Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: MTH020 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. All face-to-face sections require a headset. All sections (except W1) use instruction in the most current Microsoft Office Suite. Note: Not all hybrid sections start in week one.

Assignments in this course must be completed with Microsoft Office 365 software (Word, Excel, PowerPoint). Students can download this software for FREE at mhcc.edu/OfficeInstall.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze spreadsheet results for reasonableness and accurate
  2. Apply simple formulas and functions on a spreadsheet, appropriately
  3. Create a new presentation
  4. Create a new spreadsheet
  5. Create a new word processing document
  6. Create a presentation hand-out
  7. Incorporate a table into a document
  8. Incorporate graphics into a document
  9. Modify the content and operation of a multi-slide presentation
  10. Perform common data entry and editing techniques to a spreadsheet
  11. Perform common document management techniques such as Open, Save, Save As and print
  12. Perform common editing techniques to a presentation
  13. Perform common editing techniques to a word processing document
  14. Perform common formatting techniques to modify the appearance of a document
  15. Perform common formatting techniques to modify the appearance of a spreadsheet
  16. Perform common spreadsheet management techniques such as Open, Save, Save As and print

CIS122 Computer Concepts III (Course offered online)

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: CIS120 and CIS120L, or ISTM183A, or CIS125GA, or BA131; or instructor consent.

An introduction to programming for majors and non-majors. Emphasizes the importance of program design as part of the software development life cycle. Provides examples of well-designed software projects and introduces the student to effective design techniques. Students are expected to design small programming projects and implement the designs in a high-level programming language. Structured program construction techniques, data validation and user interface issues are explored as part of introduction to a high-level language.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate basic debugging techniques
  2. Demonstrate programming proficiency using simple scripts (e.g. linear, looping, automation)
  3. Describe basic Boolean operations (e.g. AND, OR, XOR, NOT)
  4. Describe data variable assignment.
  5. Describe Object Oriented programming and object creation.
  6. Differentiate various secure programming techniques (e.g. data validation, try/except, etc.)
  7. From a design document, write short error-free programs using variables, subroutines/functions, control structures, and arrays
  8. Properly apply basic programming constructs and concepts
  9. Solve programming problems using simple and compound conditional code (e.g. if/elif/else, switch, case, etc.)

CIS125DB Desktop Database (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels. Recommended co-requisite: CIS125SS.

This course provides a hands-on overview of the capabilities of the Microsoft Access database product. Emphasis is on creating and populating databases; defining simple queries and reports; maintenance/modification of a database; creating and enhancing reports and forms for data output/input; creating an application system built around a database, multiple tables and queries; database administration; and customizing forms using Visual Basic for applications.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Administer a database by analyzing for performance, enhancing security for users vs. administrators, backup and use SQL to maintain tables and table contents
  2. Compare a set of Excel workbook to a database
  3. Create a relationships diagram and explain its' value
  4. Define 1-to-1, 1-to-many, and many-to-many relationships by giving examples of each
  5. Define referential integrity by giving examples
  6. Define the terms field, record, table, filter, query, sort and database, giving examples of each
  7. Distinguish between primary and foreign key and state how each relates to tables within a database
  8. Import data from an Excel workbook for inclusion in an Access database
  9. Using a database, be able to perform the following tasks:a. Create and populate tablesb. Create forms, subforms, queries, hyperlinks and reportsc. Modify and enhance the structured. Create a report using multiple tables and multiple queriese. Use the Switchboard Manager to create a multiple-level switchboardf. Generate macros to automate an applicationg. Customize forms using Visual Basic for Applications

CIS125GA Beginning Game Programming (Course offered online)

Credits 3Summer/Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: MTH020 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels. Basic proficiency using a PC such as launching software, locating and opening files, use of the internet and a web browser; familiarity with basic PC concepts and terms; familiarity with at least one common game platform; experience with common video games of various types all recommended.

This course introduces students to video game concepts and design. Students build fundamental game scenarios using game software to create simple interactive applications. Students are exposed to basic techniques (Events) for character (Object) control.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of Boolean and Conditional Logic
  2. Demonstrate how external actions can influence the actions of an object
  3. Describe the concept of Object Oriented Programming (OOP) within the concept of simple game design
  4. Design a custom interactive application
  5. Design logical structures using algorithms
  6. Implement OOP concepts within a game environment

CIS125SS Spreadsheets (Course offered online)

Credits 3Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels.

This course provides an overview of the capabilities of the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet product. Emphasis is on spreadsheet creation, editing, formatting, copying, deleting and formula specification, spreadsheet functions, font selection, shading, borders, editing and data entry techniques, formulas, various file and printing options, window creation and election, advanced database-like activities, sort query, macros (recorded and written) and specialized menus. The outcomes of this class align with the NIST/CAE Knowledge Unit 'Basic Data Analysis'.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply standard statistical inference procedures to draw conclusions from data.
  2. Critically analyze data using common statistical analysis tools (e.g. spreadsheet functions)
  3. Demonstrate the process of recording and running Excel macros
  4. Describe the Excel (Windows) spreadsheet environment
  5. Describe the manipulation of spreadsheet data, using Sort and Query activities
  6. Describe the processes to freeze worksheet titles, split worksheet windows, open new window views and customize toolbars
  7. Describe the use of name formulas, names and references display, names and references, and 3-dimensional names
  8. Discuss the design and development of complex Excel spreadsheets
  9. Discuss the format of zero values, display of negative values, format styles, multiple worksheets and multiple ranges
  10. Discuss the process of consolidating ranges and workbook links
  11. Explain advanced editing, formatting, copying, deleting and formula specifications
  12. Explain specific features of the Excel menubar and toolbar
  13. Explain the process of finding and replacing data in tables
  14. Explain worksheet and range protection, hidden data and password protection
  15. Identify spreadsheet functions, including VLOOKUP, IF, MIN, MA,X COUNTA, ROUND and PMT

CIS125WP Word Processing (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels; or instructor consent.

This course provides an overview of the capabilities of the Microsoft Word product. Emphasis will be on word processing functions such as saving, retrieving, formatting, printing, layout and editing, formatting and font selection on a line, paragraph, page and/or document level. The course material also reviews editing methods and input/output options. This course is intended to provide students with advanced techniques in producing different forms of printed communications.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe basic word functions, including layout and editing
  2. Describe the creation and use of word processing glossaries
  3. Describe the process to modify existing styles
  4. Describe the Word (Windows) word processing environment
  5. Differentiate between simple and complex formatting and font changes
  6. Differentiate between various formatting styles
  7. Discuss effective title pages, the method of creating them, and their use in the workplace
  8. Discuss the practice and use of the software mailing labels feature
  9. Discuss the purpose of and process to Hide and UnHide text within the word processing environment
  10. Discuss the transfer of information between word processing applications and other software
  11. Discuss the use and creation of footnotes and endnotes in the workplace
  12. Explain how to create processing functions, including layout and editing
  13. Explain requirements for printing and/or interchanging text with other word processing programs and plain text files
  14. Explain the process of changing default software settings
  15. Explain the processes of moving other application information into a word processing environment
  16. Explain the use and creation of headers and footers in the workplace
  17. Explain the use and creation of word processing tabs and tables
  18. Identify standard default settings of the software
  19. Identify word processing keyboard shortcuts and their use in the workplace

CIS135 Introduction to Game Industry (Course offered online)

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: Experience with different games across multiple platforms recommended.

This course is a general introduction computer gaming as an industry. Students evaluate and analyze a variety of aspects of games and related products, propose game concepts and create design documentation based on their findings. Topics are rotating based on current industry events and technologies, and may include market and legal analyses, representation and diversity, business practices, game and product evaluation and alternative uses for game technologies.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze and define target audiences for a variety of interactive product types
  2. Critically analyze current legal, representational and ethical issues within the game industry
  3. Critically analyze what defines a successful gaming product
  4. Define and categorize different gaming genres and alternative uses for gaming technologies
  5. Design and pitch a game concept, with emphasis on market feasibility analysis
  6. Explain demonetization and market techniques used by currently trending packages
  7. Produce a design document for class evaluation and discussion

CIS135GMA Introduction to 3-D Modeling (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels. Recommended co-requisite: CIS125GA.

This class provides an overview of the Maya interface and an introduction to various topics and technique used in game, movie, commercial and interactive applications. Students achieve beginner-level Maya familiarity and an understanding of the first tier of menus. Topics covered include basic navigation and menu familiarity, polygon and "low-poly" techniques, non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS), basic rendering and lighting in mental ray and Maya software.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply realistic lighting and shading
  2. Create and optimize game-ready low polygon models
  3. Demonstrate appropriate techniques for creating game engine ready UV layouts.
  4. Demonstrate correct use of a variety of texture maps within the Hypershade Material Editor
  5. Identify and understand object and component level elements of a model
  6. Produce studio quality renders

CIS135GMB Intermediate Game Modeling (Course offered online)

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: CIS135GMA; or instructor consent.

This class provides further experience with the Maya interface and menus. Intermediate techniques and tools are covered, as well as further exploration of theory, lighting and rendering. Students create more advanced models and learn techniques to prepare them for export and use in interactive environments. Students are encouraged to select a focus for their modeling and begin creating content for an entry-level portfolio and demo reel.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze different UV techniques for use on different model types
  2. Create complex lighting and rendering scenarios
  3. Create game ready, modular environment kits
  4. Model complex objects within given specifications and themes
  5. Prepare models and texture maps for import and use in game engines

CIS135GMC Advanced 3-D Modeling (Course offered online)

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels. Co-requisite: CIS235ANM.

(Formerly CIS235GMA) This course covers advanced 3-D modeling and character development using Maya. Emphasis is placed on proper topology for deformation and biomechanics, advanced modeling techniques, and character design.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Create animation ready character models
  2. Demonstrate different modeling techniques for high and low poly applications
  3. Efficiently UV and UVwrap a complex character model
  4. Evaluate topological needs based on use and natural biomechanics
  5. Identify main anatomical structures and muscle groups

CIS135GRA Graphics for Game Asset Development I (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels. Basic computer skills are required.

This course covers the basic fundamentals of 2D graphical element creation for use in various aspects of the computer game development, including asset texturing, Graphical User Interface / Heads Up Display (GUI/HUD) applications and Sprite sheets. Emphasis of this class is on technique and software usage. Various proprietary and open-source software packages are used.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Create useable sprite sheets for 2D gaming applications
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic tools sets needed to create 2d Graphical elements
  3. Design user friendly HUD interfaces
  4. Evaluate appropriate techniques and file formats on a per project basis
  5. Identify the various 2D elements for different genres in a production pipeline
  6. Use Vector based imaging programs to create custom branding for their projects

CIS135GRB Graphics for Game Asset Development II (Course offered online)

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: CIS135GRA, or strong experience in image manipulation software (e.g., Photoshop); or instructor consent. Recommended co-requisite: CIS135GMB.

(Formerly CIS197TXT) This course covers basic and "Next-Gen" texturing for 3-D models and game applications. Texturing concepts and practice are used to create more efficient models and environments, as well as introducing core concepts of the Hypershad, UV texture editor and introductory digital sculpting techniques.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Create an entry level portfolio piece using digital sculpting with an industry standard software package
  2. Demonstrate how various attributes of a shader can be used to effectively simulate real world materials
  3. Demonstrate the construction of a variety of procedural materials
  4. Describe how controllable properties of light are used to define a surface within a rendering engine
  5. Identify techniques for using digital sculpting in an asset development pipeline
  6. Use the UV texture editor to unwrap, flatten and pack UV shells

CIS135TXP Special Topics in Emerging Technologies (Course offered online)

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: CIS125GA, CIS135GMB, and either CIS135GRA or CIS197WAG; or workforce proficiency; or instructor permission.

This course covers a rotating topic in game technology, allowing students to supplement their skills with an specialty class in a variety of trending technological topics, such as Alternative User interfaces (Kinect, Oculus rift) Visual FX, AR (augmented reality), VR (Virtual reality) and other currently relevant topics.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contract advantages and disadvantages of presented material in context with real world project scenarios
  2. Create a project demonstrating proficiency in the currently selected topic
  3. Design concept project documentation appropriate to the presented technology
  4. Evaluate topics potential in context of portfolio and job market
  5. Explore current, trending hardware/software or techniques

CIS151 Introduction to Networks

Credits 4Summer/Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels.

CIS151 is the first of a four-course sequence that uses the Cisco Networking Academy curriculum. The course is a comprehensive program designed to teach student networking and internetworking technology skills. It introduces networking standards, concepts, topology, media and terminology including LANs, WANs, the OSI model, cabling, IP addressing, subnetting, network hardware and various protocols. Additional material is supplied that goes beyond the scope of the Cisco curriculum.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Calculate an IPv4 subnetting scheme to efficiently segment your network
  2. Calculate numbers between decimal and binary systems
  3. Compare the operations of transport layer protocols in supporting end-to-end communication
  4. Configure switches and routers with device hardening features to enhance security
  5. Explain how ARP and ND enable communication on a local area network
  6. Explain how Ethernet operates in a switched network
  7. Explain how media access control in the data link layer supports communication across networks
  8. Explain how network protocols enable devices to access local and remote network resources
  9. Explain how physical layer protocols, services, and network media support communications acrossdata networks
  10. Explain how routers use network layer protocols and services to enable end-to-end connectivity
  11. Explain the advances in modern network technologies
  12. Explain the operation of application layer protocols in providing support to end-user applications
  13. Implement a network design for a small network to include a router, a switch, and end devices
  14. Implement an IPv6 addressing scheme
  15. Implement initial settings including passwords, IP addressing, and default gateway parameters on anetwork switch and end devices
  16. Implement initial settings on a router and end devices
  17. Use various tools to test network connectivity

CIS152 Routing and Switching Essentials

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: CIS151.

CIS152 is the second of a three-course sequence that uses the Cisco Networking Academy curriculum. This course provides an overview of hardware device configurations, switching and routing concepts, an introduction to wireless technologies, and extensive troubleshooting opportunities. This course also provides additional information on routing theory and protocols beyond that of the basic Cisco Networking Academy semester two course, leading to a more detailed understanding of routing.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Configure devices by using security best practices
  2. Configure IPv4 and IPv6 floating static routes
  3. Configure switch security to mitigate LAN attacks
  4. Explain how FHRPs provide default gateway services in a redundant network
  5. Explain how Layer 2 switches forward data
  6. Explain how routers use information in packets to make forwarding decisions
  7. Explain how STP enables redundancy in a Layer 2 network
  8. Explain how to troubleshoot static and default route configurations
  9. Explain how vulnerabilities compromise LAN security
  10. Explain how WLANs enable network connectivity
  11. Explain the operation of dynamic address allocation in IPv6 networks
  12. Implement a WLAN using a wireless router and WLC
  13. Implement DHCPv4 to operate across multiple LANs
  14. Implement VLANs and trunking in a switched network
  15. Troubleshoot EtherChannel on switched links
  16. Troubleshoot inter-VLAN routing on Layer 3 devices

CIS153 Scaling Networks

Credits 4Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: CIS152.

This course provides students with a deeper understanding of the advanced functionality of routers and switches. Students will get experience with the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol, design access control lists to filter network traffic. They will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to manage, design, troubleshoot, and virtualize networks while automate certain network tasks.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Explain how ACLs are used as part of a network security policy
  2. Explain how network automation is enabled through RESTful APIs and configuration management tools
  3. Explain how networking devices implement QoS
  4. Explain how single-area OSPF operates in both point-to-point and broadcast multiaccess networks
  5. Explain how VPNs and IPsec are used to secure site-to-site and remote access connectivity
  6. Explain how vulnerabilities, threats, and exploits can be mitigated to enhance network security
  7. Explain how WAN access technologies can be used to satisfy business requirements
  8. Explain the characteristics of scalable network architectures
  9. Explain the purpose and characteristics of network virtualization
  10. Implement IPv4 ACLs to filter traffic and secure administrative access
  11. Implement NAT services on the edge router to provide IPv4 address scalability
  12. Implement network management protocols to monitor the network
  13. Implement single-area OSPFv2 in both point-to-point and broadcast multiaccess networks
  14. Troubleshoot enterprise networks

CIS195 Interface Design for Interactive Applications (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: MTH020 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This non-coding course covers the fundamentals of creating testable design prototypes for a variety of interactive applications including websites, mobile and application development, internet of things and game design. It brings together explorations of user feedback, prototyping methods and interface design to create optimal user experiences.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze the pros and cons of different prototyping methods
  2. Analyze the roles of user feedback testing in iterative prototyping
  3. Analyze various design techniques for mobile devices
  4. Critically analyze existing user interfaces for appropriate form and function in a variety of applications
  5. Critically analyzes social media's influence on UI (User Interfaces) and UX ( User Experience ) design
  6. Design an appropriate navigational structure for a complex application
  7. Identify and describe a target audience and create designs interfaces appropriate to a variety of human based scenarios

CIS197CSP Web Authoring: Client-Side Programming (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: Co-requisite: CIS197HTM, or HTML experience equal to CIS197HTM and instructor consent.

This introductory programming course presents the fundamentals of creating dynamic HTML documents using client-side programming techniques such as JavaScript or AJAX. Topics included: variables and data types, syntax, objects and functions (built-in, user-defined), embedding scripts into HTML documents, security tips and concerns and using the Document Model (DOM).

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate functions (built-in and user-defined)
  2. Describe and use variables
  3. Develop scripts that correctly implement solutions to specific web page tasks
  4. Embed script code into web pages
  5. Identify all components of objects
  6. Utilize DOM techniques on a form to capture data and prepare it for emailing
  7. Write a syntactically correct script

CIS197HTM Web Authoring: HTML5 and CSS3 (Course offered online)

Credits 3Summer/Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels. General computer and internet knowledge is strongly recommended for student success.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of web design with a focus on exposing students to HTML5 and CSS3 (the building blocks of web design and development). Students will learn how to use the appropriate tools and strategies to build simple web pages fully from code intentionally and effectively. This course will also feature coding best practices and the fundamentals of layout design for modern usage.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Begin to demonstrate best practices within the web design field in terms of writing effective code and crafting page design
  2. Deeply understand fundamental concepts of the HTML5 and CSS3 languages and make intentional choices in code to produce desired outcomes
  3. Use the appropriate tools and organizational strategies to build a simple web page using HTML5 and CSS3 in a modern environment

CIS197WAA Web Authoring: Applications

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: MTH020 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels.

This introductory course covers the basics of creating web pages using popular web design software. The course includes basic page creation, format and layout manipulation, basic site navigation, forms and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Incorporation of various table styles, images, basic animation and media objects are covered. Intermediate knowledge of computers, computer systems and mobile devices equal to CIS120 is strongly recommended for student success.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast web hosting services to determine the most appropriate hosting service for a given website project
  2. Compare and contrast website designs to determine the most appropriate design for a given application
  3. Create complex websites accessible via appropriate navigational techniques
  4. Critique existing websites designs for form and function
  5. Cultivate and maintain a successful client-designer relationship for the duration of a website design project
  6. Demonstrate the techniques to incorporate various Web images and animation into a Web page
  7. Describe and demonstrate the interface between popular Web design software and other popular support software
  8. Design and defend a Web page layout using a variety of solutions

CIS225 Computer End-User Support I (Course offered online)

Credits 4Winter

Registration Requirement: Corequisite: CIS120 and CIS120L or ISTM183A; or instructor consent.

This course explores software tools to help manage requests for end-user support and resolve problems in a timely fashion including: computer-user support and customer service skills; troubleshooting basic computer problems; help desk operation; user support management; product evaluation strategies and support standards; user needs analysis and assessment methods; installing end-user computer systems; training computer users; and writing for end-users and computer facilities management. Various software will be explained for features such as logging and tracking incoming calls, audit trail, escalations, notification and follow-up, standard reporting, guide help systems and "gathered knowledge" for an expert system.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate the use of a basic tracking or ticketing system providing support consistent with the needs of a small- or medium-sized non-technical business.
  2. Design and demonstrate communication skills (speaking, writing, presentation) appropriate for delivering technical support to non-technical customers.
  3. Discuss, design, and defend a variety of software, applications, and systems necessary to provide technical support to a small or medium sized business (including existing programs, applications, etc. necessary to organize and track customer service issues)

CIS235 Game Design Theory

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: CIS135 or instructor consent. Experience with different games across multiple platforms preferred.

Students design and describe various techniques for developing immersive game levels and how to use a variety of tools to make an engaging and successful game. Emphasis will be placed on design and analysis, as well as implementing strategy, "Boss" conflicts and player goals. Students are introduced to designing terrain and structures within existing game engine limitations.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast different QA concepts and defend at least one QA concept appropriate for the class game
  2. Critically analyze different game engines for appropriateness toward different game designs
  3. Design multiple levels for a game concept
  4. Differentiate with examples techniques which will detract from the playability of the levels
  5. Explain the differences in the various levels
  6. Give examples of specific techniques which will enhance the playability of the levels
  7. Incorporate current Quality Analysis (QA) and testing techniques
  8. Prioritize design elements with respect to the technological limitations of existing game engines
  9. Propose a multilevel game concept

CIS235ANM Introduction to 3-D Animation (Course offered online)

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels. Recommended CIS135GMA, CIS135RIG. Recommended co-requisite: CIS135GMC.

Students are introduced to the classical principles of animation and learn how to translate realistic movement, weight and appeal into a 3-D environment. Students study techniques used for both the games and movie industry and create action and idle loops for games, as well as learn how to create a narrative animation to a sound clip.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. "Compare and contrast different animations techniques useful for enhancing a story
  2. Construct an animated ball bounce
  3. Construct an animated walk cycle
  4. Create animations with realistic weight and movement
  5. Create game-engine ready looping cycles
  6. ""Describe how to use """"appeal"""" and """"exaggeration"""" to tell a story""
  7. Identify and apply the 12 principles of animation
  8. Illustrate basic animation techniques
  9. "

CIS235CXP Career Specific Exploration for Game Majors (Course offered online)

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: CIS135GMC, CIS235TLC, CIS235RIG, and either CIS135GRA or CIS197WAG; or workforce proficiency; or instructor permission.

This course allows students to engage in an instructor guided curriculum to enhance their skills in their selected game-career path. Students will use a variety of external multimedia sources to compose, with instructor assistance and evaluation, a skill enhancing exploration of their chosen field.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze job opportunities to create a useful exploration plan
  2. Compare and contrast advantages / disadvantages of different techniques to real world scenarios
  3. Demonstrate results of exploration through a variety of targeted, in class projects
  4. Design a personalized curriculum with assistance from instructor
  5. Utilize a variety of multi-media elements to enhance their chosen skill set

CIS235DD Introduction to Digital Painting and Concepting (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: CIS135GRA or CIS197WAG or instructor consent. Experience with image software preferred.

Students utilize image manipulation software (such as Photoshop) and other digital art software as a medium for creating concept art, illustration and fine art for a variety of potential applications. Emphases is placed on utilizing the students' individual styles to create a marketable portfolio geared for their chosen industry.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Communicate deep understanding of volume, light and color
  2. Convert project designs into digital images
  3. Defend chosen graphic designs and/or fine art concepts
  4. Demonstrate proficiency with the software
  5. Design projects from concept to implementation
  6. Differentiate the appropriateness of various artworks for industry applications
  7. Evaluate several alternative solutions while working within predefined constraints
  8. Projects enhanced design skills to solve intermediate-level image manipulation needs

CIS235RIG Rigging for Animation and Games (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: CIS235ANM.

Students learn basic 3-D object rigging techniques to create an object with motion believability. Using animation software such as Maya, students build skeletons, bind models and use weight painting techniques to create realistic simulations of biomechanical principles for games and animation applications. Students learn industry standard control schemes, set driven keys and blend shapes to enhance their rigging systems. Scripting for rigging is also introduced.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. "Analyze and create a phoneme system for speaking characters
  2. Construct a Maya skeleton
  3. Create Blend Shapes for highly controllable and natural facial movements
  4. Differentiate various model binding techniques
  5. Identify and define various principles of biomechanics and movement
  6. Integrate simple scripts to expedite time consuming processes
  7. ""Use """"set driven keys"""" to create automated movement and limit deformations on a model""
  8. ""Use """"weight painting"""" to predict the actions of polygons on a movable object (such as a muscle)""
  9. "

CIS235ST Game Studio (Course offered online)

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: CIS235UNA, CIS235CXP and prior work; or instructor consent.

This sixth-term course provides the student the opportunity to put the final polish on previous work in preparation for final portfolio. Students create a personal brand. Finished materials will be organized into a portfolio suitable for presentation or upload to the web.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Appraise local game studios and the local game industry
  2. Collaborate with other students to complete complex projects (team development optional)
  3. Compile a portfolio
  4. Create an online portfolio website
  5. Demonstrate appropriate techniques for producing a portfolio
  6. Demonstrate proficiency with the software
  7. Design a personal brand
  8. Differentiate various personal brand styles
  9. Reconstruct prior work in preparation for inclusion in portfolio
  10. Synthesize the combined experience of previous classes to create a new portfolio piece

CIS235TLC Team Level Creation (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels; and strong experience in game engine software; or instructor consent. Second-year program standing is recommended.

Students gain industry experience through production of a small, portfolio-quality game demo using the documentation and designs. Students utilize their chosen disciplines in a team environment, and get hands on experience with the game industry standard Unreal engine.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Adapt design documentation to create a demo to predefined specifications
  2. Appraise various techniques to develop a cohesive team to produce a portfolio quality final product
  3. Demonstrate proficiency with the software
  4. Evaluate various roles within the game creation pipeline
  5. Integrate models, sound and animation into an original playable demo
  6. Integrate models, textures and materials from other artists' orthographics and spec sheets
  7. Use the Unreal engine in a game production environment

CIS235UNA Small Games Programming I (Course offered online)

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: CIS125GA; or strong experience in game engine software (e.g. Unreal); or instructor approval.

Students build on their programming foundations to work with a popular industry game engine to produce functional games ideal for the mobile environment.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply logical thinking to find ideal solutions for common programming problems
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of programming foundations through assigned projects
  3. Demonstrate proficiency with the software and engines
  4. Design a game concept incorporating common game techniques (e.g. looping, decision structures, hit points, etc.)
  5. Diagram flow charts, storyboards and pseudocode to express logical flows
  6. Evaluate the technical differences between 2d and 3d applications
  7. Identify key games mechanics for popular genres
  8. Integrate externally produced assets into a cohesive project
  9. Utilize engine specific functions for appropriate output platforms

CIS235UNB Small Games Programming II (Course offered online)

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: CIS235UNA; or instructor consent.

Students individually design and produce fully functional games for web and mobile, using industry standard games engines and languages. Through guided projects, students create a portfolio-level application of their own design, demonstrating their understanding of programming foundations and engine specific tool sets.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply balance and risk reward theories to a fully realized design
  2. Create design documents in industry standard formats
  3. Demonstrate proficiency with the engine and software
  4. Design a game concept incorporating common game techniques (e.g. looping, decision structures, hit points, etc.)
  5. Design functional user interfaces
  6. Diagram theories of level design and play
  7. Evaluate appropriate controls / GUI/ HUD solutions based on platform constraints
  8. Present and defend the game concept to the class
  9. Produce a playable game demo within the constraints set forth by the project

CIS276 SQL

Credits 4Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels.

CIS276 addresses the needs of information technology organizations to solve their data problems. User interaction with databases is accomplished using a "Structured Query Language" or SQL per the industry ANSI-SQL standard. The course presents SQL using Oracle as a vehicle, yet concepts and exercises are solvable using any propriety SQL.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Create users and assign the privileges necessary for a user to complete various tasks
  2. Create, modify and drop database tables
  3. Enforce business rules through the use of table constraints
  4. Identify SQL differences amongst various databases
  5. Issue SQL commands that will retrieve data based on criteria specified by a user
  6. Manipulate data stored in database tables
  7. Perform calculations based on data contained within a database
  8. Use SQL commands to join tables and retrieve data from the joined tables
  9. Use subqueries to retrieve data based on unknown conditions

CIS279S Windows Server OS

Credits 4Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: CIS151 or instructor consent.

This course provides a foundation for supporting Microsoft Windows Server OS, including the skills to configure, customize, optimize, integrate and troubleshoot networks. This course is designed for the individual who may become responsible for the planning, design, implementation and support of a Windows Server. Topics covered include the active directory, networking, security, creating users/groups, the NTFS file system and troubleshooting. This course can assist students preparing for the Microsoft Windows Server certification examination.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analysis and implement a disaster recovery program for the server environment
  2. Configure a Windows Server OS application server
  3. Examine and discuss software update services and licensing agreements
  4. Manage and maintain access to resources in a server environment
  5. Manage local, roaming and mandatory profiles
  6. Monitor server hardware
  7. Optimize server disk performance

CIS284S Preparation for Security+ (Course offered online)

Credits 4Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020, each with a grade of "C" or better; or placement above stated course levels.

This course is designed to provide students with the fundamentals of computer security, and to help prepare for the CompTIA Security+ exam. It covers material related to general computer security concepts, communications security, infrastructure security, basics of cryptography and operational/organizational security. Packet filtering, password policies and file integrity checking are also covered.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Create security policies to secure files and print resources
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of cryptography, access control and authentication
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of operational and organization security
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of security threats
  5. Prevent against external attack

CIS297 Capstone Project Development

Credits 4Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, each with a grade of "C" or better; and MTH020; or placement above stated course levels.

This course is a capstone class for all students in the CIS and CS curriculum tracks. The application of newly acquired knowledge and skills to the real world is the student's ultimate goal of this course. Students select and explore a topic that both relates to their specific studies and their field of work. The result of this project is presented in an appropriate form to the student's peers and potentially, to the student's future/present employer as evidence of competence. In addition, students prepare material necessary to market one's self into their chosen career path.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply and demonstrate their specific Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Computer Science (CS) curriculum track knowledge in a real-world environment
  2. Create material to market one's self consistent with their chosen career path
  3. Develop and implement a problem solution/project specifically related to their area of concentration within the Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Computer Science (CS) program, preparing the necessary materials to present the project to peers as well as potential/future employers
  4. Perform and operate in a team setting with other information technology literate individuals

ISTM100A Preparation For An Education in I.T. and Cybersecurity 1 (Course offered online)

Credit 1Fall

Registration Requirement: Co-Requisite: ISTM183C or ISTM183A or ISTM183B or Instructor consent.

This course is part of a three-course series that prepares students to meet the demanding nature of pursuing an education in the fields of information technology and cybersecurity. This series focuses on essential concepts and skills needed for academic success throughout the cybersecurity (ISTM) and computer information systems (CIS) programs. Students are given explicit support in their ISTM and CIS courses, while learning effective study, reading, and notetaking skills as it pertains to their technology related coursework. In ISTM100A students are introduced to college services and resources, college policies and procedures, time management concepts, different learning strategies, and are introduced to peer groups.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply metacognitive and research-based study strategies to coursework to aid in students overall success as a technology student.
  2. Critically and actively read college-level, technology themed texts/resources, and demonstrate that they can extract the central ideas and processes from those texts/resources
  3. Draft a clear scope of assessments, routines, due-dates, and other important expectations for a college course
  4. Create digital or physical organizational tools to ensure that they are highly organized and have a clear sense of all the various assets for a course
  5. Distinguish between various departments, organizations, and support services within a typical college/university

ISTM100B Preparation For An Education in I.T. and Cybersecurity 2 (Course offered online)

Credit 1Winter

Registration Requirement: Co-Requisite: ISTM183C OR ISTM183A OR ISTM183B OR instructor consent.

This course is part of a three-course series prepares students to meet the demanding nature of pursuing an education in the fields of information technology and cybersecurity. This series focuses on essential concepts and skills needed for academic success throughout the cybersecurity (ISTM) and computer information systems (CIS) programs. In ISTM100B students are reintroduced to concepts presented in ISTM100A along with test-taking skills and strategies needed to prepare for industry-level certification exams required in the field of information technology and cybersecurity. Also introduced are various troubleshooting tips and techniques used in the technology industry.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply metacognitive and research-based study strategies to coursework to aid in students overall success as a technology student.
  2. Apply various exam-taking techniques to successfully study for and attempt industry-recognized certification exams found across the IT and information security sector
  3. Critically and actively read college-level, technology themed texts/resources, and demonstrate that they can extract the central ideas and processes from those texts/resources
  4. Demonstrate problem-solving and self-advocacy by accessing and utilizing appropriate college resources

ISTM100C Preparation For An Education in I.T. and Cybersecurity 3 (Course offered online)

Credit 1Spring

Registration Requirement: Co-Requisite: ISTM183C OR ISTM183A OR ISTM183B OR instructor consent.

This course is part of a three-course series to prepare students to meet the demanding nature of pursuing an education in the fields of information technology and cybersecurity. This series focuses on essential concepts and skills needed for academic success throughout the cybersecurity (ISTM) and computer information systems (CIS) programs. In ISTM100C students are reintroduced to concepts presented in both ISTM100A and ISTM100B. Students also form meaningful and structured academic peer groups in preparation for cybersecurity competitions.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply metacognitive and research-based study strategies to coursework to aid in students overall success as a technology student.
  2. Utilize various exam-taking techniques to successfully study for and attempt industry-recognized certification exams found across the IT and information security sector
  3. Critically and actively read college-level, technology themed texts/resources, and demonstrate that they can extract the central ideas and processes from those texts/resources
  4. Work effectively in a collaborative peer group in the pursuit of group-based assessments and as a general study group

ISTM133P Introduction to Python (Course offered online)

Credits 4Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: CIS120 and CIS120L, or instructor consent.

An introduction to Python programming for majors and non-majors. Emphasizes the importance of program design as part of the software development life cycle. Provides examples of well-designed software projects and introduces the student to effective design techniques. Students are expected to design small programming projects and implement the designs in the Python programming language. Structured program construction techniques, object orientation, data validation and user interface issues are explored as part of introduction to a high-level scripting language.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate basic debugging techniques
  2. Demonstrate programming proficiency using simple scripts (e.g. linear, looping, automation)
  3. Describe basic Boolean operations (e.g. AND, OR, XOR, NOT)
  4. Describe data variable assignment.
  5. Describe Object Oriented programming and object creation.
  6. Differentiate various secure programming techniques (e.g. data validation, try/except, etc.)
  7. Properly apply basic programming constructs and concepts
  8. Solve programming problems using simple and compound conditional code (e.g. if/elif/else, switch, case, etc.)
  9. Write short error-free programs using variables, subroutines/functions, control structures, and arrays from a design document

ISTM140L Preparation for Linux (Course offered online)

Credits 4Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels. Participation in this class is recommended before starting second-year cyber security training.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals concepts of the Linux operating system. This course serves two purposes: to introduce students to the Linux environment and build functional skills around command-line interfaces, and introduces students to Linux server and system administration concepts. The current version of this class focuses on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (and preparation for the RHSCA exam). However, the skills developed in this course can be transferred to other Linux distributions as well.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Perform basic to intermediate system administration tasks, including configuration, maintenance, deployment, and management
  2. Work with the Linux command line interface functionally and fluidly as a means to accomplish a range of given tasks

ISTM151N Preparation for Network+

Credits 4Fall/Spring

Registration Requirement: None. Basic computer literacy is recommended.

This class prepares students for the current version of the CompTIA Network+ certification exam. Training in this class is designed toward acquiring basic understanding and skills necessary to provide general networking support for a technician working in a general business environment. Students will leave with basic understanding of how networks are built and operate, and will have some experience with basic network analysis tools. Students are exposed to the concept of potential vulnerabilities in a network. Most contents of this class align with the CAE Core Knowledge Unit 'Basic Networking'.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. "Critically analyze various network security issues and vulnerabilities. (O6, T9)
  2. Describe the fundamental concepts, technologies, components and issues related to communications and data networks. (O1)
  3. Design a basic network architecture given a specific need and set of hosts/clients. (O2)
  4. Differentiate coming network media (wired, optical, wireless). (T2)
  5. ""Differentiate various """"Area Network"""" topologies. (T3)""
  6. Differentiate various network protocols (IP, TCP, UDP, ICMP). (T5)
  7. Differentiate various network services (DNS, NPT, VLAN). (T6)
  8. Identify and describe various network administrative tools. (T8)
  9. Identify and explain the networking models OSI and IP. (T1)
  10. Identify common network devices and explain their role in a network (Routers, Switches, Hosts, VPNs, Firewalls) . (T4)
  11. "

ISTM171 Introduction to Cloud and Virtualization Technologies (Course offered online)

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090, WR090, and MTH020 with a "C" grade or better.

This course will introduce students to the foundational principals of cloud and virtualization technology. Students will get access to real cloud computing platforms, and build and manage cloud infrastructure. Students will also learn the foundational of virtualization technologies, and the infrastructure of virtualized systems. This course will help to prepare students for industry certifications involving cloud and virtualization technologies.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Configure and deploy cloud and virtualization technologies
  2. Define the risks, solutions, and considerations surrounding cloud and virtualization security
  3. Maintain and update existing cloud and virtualization instances and configurations
  4. Manage the logistics of implementing and maintaining cloud infrastructure
  5. Troubleshoot and resolve common cloud and virtualization-related issues

ISTM183A Preparation for A+ Essentials

Credits 3Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels.

Students in this class receive training in the material appropriate to prepare for the CompTIA A+ Essential certification. Topics in this class include PC system components, storage devices, mobile computers, printer installation and configuration, operating systems features and interfaces, troubleshooting theory and preventative maintenance, as well as other topics leading to computer competency. Students are strongly encouraged to complete ISTM183A before enrolling in ISTM183B. However; co-enrollment or reverse ordering is permitted.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast various computer network strategies.
  2. Compare and contrast various mobile computing devices
  3. Describe the hardware components of modern computing environments and their individual functions.
  4. Differentiate between troubleshooting theories.
  5. Identify and describe common primary storage devices.
  6. Identify various operating system features.
  7. Identify, describe and configure display devices.
  8. Prepare students to participate in the CompTIA A+ Essentials certification
  9. Properly use the Vocabulary associated with cyber security.
  10. Recommend an appropriate preventive maintenance protocol.
  11. Recommend operating system settings for optimal computer operation.
  12. Troubleshoot basic office computer devices (hardware, software, printers, etc.)

ISTM183B Preparation for A+ Practical Application (Course offered online)

Credits 3Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ISTM183A; or CompTIA Essentials Certification (220-901).

Students in this class will receive training in the material appropriate to prepare for the CompTIA A+ Practical Application certification (presently 220-902). Topics in this class include basic networking, networking security fundamentals, basic network installation, operational procedures, installation and maintenance of various computer components, resolving printer problems, system structures and commands, system security and fundamental CyberSecurity concepts. Students are strongly encouraged to complete ISTM183A before enrolling in ISTM183B. However; co-enrollment or reverse ordering is permitted.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply troubleshooting skills
  2. Assemble components based on customer requirements
  3. Install, configure and maintain devices, PCs and software for end users
  4. Properly and safely diagnose, resolve and document common hardware and software issues
  5. Provide appropriate customer support
  6. Understand the basics of networking and security/forensics
  7. Understand the basics of virtualization, desktop imaging and deployment

ISTM183C Fundamentals of CyberSecurity

Credits 3Fall/Winter

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels.

This course focuses on introducing students to the critical concepts and principals that surround cyber security. The primary purpose of this course functions as a survey of major topics in the cybersecurity field, but also introduces a range of interrelated industry vocabulary, tools, frameworks, and methodologies. This class should be taken prior to any 200-level security courses.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Define and understand the context and importance of core principles of cyber security
  2. Evaluate various security systems, practices, and frameworks for overall effectiveness, usability, and feasibility
  3. Properly and intentionally use and understand the vocabulary associated with cyber security

ISTM189 Wireless Security (Course offered online)

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090, WR090, and MTH020 with a "C" or better. CIS151 preferred, but not required.

This course focuses on securing wireless networks through encryption, analysis, and performance-based metrics. Students will be able to configure and troubleshoot wireless network systems with specific configuration needs determined by the activity.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Develop a report that will analyze the impact of wireless technologies on radio-based devices
  2. Evaluate wireless security risks for personal and enterprise networks
  3. List terminology associated with wireless security, including acronyms
  4. Recommend appropriate mitigation actions for any identified risks as well as the potential impact
  5. Research and develop an enforceable wireless security policy, including encryption and monitoring methods
  6. Use physical port security, access control lists, and firewall settings to prevent unauthorized access

ISTM197IIT Internet Infrastructure and Technologies (Course offered online)

Credits 3Summer/Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W, with a grade of "C" or higher; and MTH020 or higher; or placement above stated levels. Recommended requisite: Programming language experience recommended but not required.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamental infrastructure that powers the Internet. It focuses on both the physical and logical infrastructure that the Internet relies on. Students examine major programming languages used to develop web applications and, by the end of the course, are able to develop small web applications. Various protocols that powers the Internet, as well as other peripheral technologies that impact the overall experience of using and maintaining the Internet are covered. This is a not a web development course, rather, it focuses on the underlying infrastructure that powers the internet.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify and categorize the underlying physical and logical infrastructure of the internet
  2. Create and modify basic web applications using modern web programming languages
  3. Relate peripheral technologies and protocols to each other and illustrate how those technologies impact web applications and the infrastructure of the internet

ISTM233P Python for Cyber Security (Course offered online)

Credits 4Winter/Spring

Registration Requirement: ISTM133P, CIS122 (if less than 5 years old), or instructor consent.

This class introduces students to intermediate Python programming skills utilizing a variety of cyber security related activities and techniques. Utilizing Python programs and libraries in a virtualized "sandbox" environment, students will create Python programs to scan network vulnerabilities, perform cryptography, perform password cracking, and more. Students participating in this class must sign an MHCC "White Hat Agreement".

View Course Outcomes:

  1. "Demonstrate proficiency in using Python for fundamental ""white hat"" security techniques
  2. Design a virtual testbed environment for safe testing of security techniques
  3. Develop intermediate level Python programming skills
  4. "

ISTM235MA Mobile Apps 1: Introduction to iOS Mobile Applications Development

Credits 3Winter

This class forwards the student into the creation of several intermediate level mobile applications and a class project of their own design. Topics in this class include working with lists, creating assets, and creating simple games. Students will design and create their own project using Apple oriented design techniques. Finished projects will be presented to the class. Much of the curriculum for this training is provided by Apple Corporation designed for Career Technical preparation.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast looping structures such as For In, While, Stride, and Repeat While
  2. Critically analyze a conditional programming scenario and choose the best structure to lead to a conclusion
  3. Demonstrate common data manipulation techniques such as data types, math, and string manipulation
  4. Demonstrate how the use of Functions creates efficiency in code
  5. Design a simple mobile application
  6. Design an intermediate mobile application
  7. Differentiate between a variety of Controls, and chose the appropriate control for a particular design requirement
  8. Present a completed intermediate mobile app

ISTM235MB Mobile Apps 2: Intermediate iOS Mobile Applications Development

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: Completion of ISTM235MA with a grade of "C" or better; OR, demonstrated prior programming skills or experience using Swift.

This class forwards the student into the creation of several intermediate level mobile applications and a class project of their own design. Topics in this class include working with lists, creating assets, and creating simple games. Students will design and create their own project using Apple oriented design techniques. Finished projects will be presented to the class. Much of the curriculum for this training is provided by Apple Corporation designed for Career Technical preparation.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. "Compare and contrast several apps of a similar genre for positive and negative functionality
  2. ""Create a class project app and design a """"story board"""" for its function""
  3. Create a new method for an existing control
  4. Create icons and images using Asset Maker or equivalent software
  5. Deliver a class presentation on the final product of the app
  6. ""Demonstrate several testing a debugging techniques to """"proof"""" an app""
  7. Demonstrate the use of internal lists to store data across events
  8. Differentiate intermediate controls and adapt them into a User Interface (UI)
  9. Differentiate various methods of making a new app available for distribution in the Store
  10. "

ISTM283A Fundamentals of Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity (Course offered online)

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: ISTM183B; or CompTIA Practical Applications certification (220-802); or instructor consent.

Students in this class receive instruction and lab assignments on Incident Response (IR), Disaster Recovery (DR) and Business Continuity (BC) which are directed to the creation of fundamental protocols necessary for the recovery and continuity of a business in the event of a severe cyber failure, disaster or attack. Students will be exposed to various laws applicable to cyber security breeches and how to maintain compliance to said laws. Students will be exposed to basic risk assessment techniques appropriate for designing a cyber security policy and procedures manual. Some outcomes of this class map to NIST/CAE Knowledge Units Cybersecurity Foundations (CSF), and IT Systems Components (ISC).

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe an organization's responsibilities related to the handling of data as it pertains to legal, ethical and/or agency auditing issues.
  2. Describe appropriate measures to be taken should a system compromise occur.
  3. Describe how the type of legal dispute (civil, criminal, private) affects the evidence used to resolve it.
  4. List the applicable laws and policies related to cyber defense and describe the major components of each pertaining to the storage and transmission of data.
  5. Understand the Federal, State and Local Cyber Defense partners/structures.

ISTM283B Firewall Implementation

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: Recommended: ISTM183C, AND; ISTM151N OR CIS151; OR Instructor Approval

This course provides the student with a general understanding of how to install, configure, and manage firewalls for defense of enterprise network architecture. Students will: learn the theory and configuration steps for setting up the security, networking, threat prevention, logging, and reporting features of next generation firewall technologies; learn the nature and scope of today’s cybersecurity challenges, strategies for network defense, as well as detailed information about next-generation cybersecurity solutions; deploy a variety of security methodologies as well as technologies and concepts used for implementing a secure network environment. Components of this class map to CAE KUs Network Defense and Cybersecurity Foundations.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply advanced filtering methodologies such as user, application, and content ID to protect against all known and unknown attack vectors
  2. Design a network defense strategy using a variety of tools (e.g. firewalls, DMZ, VPNs, Honeypots, etc.)
  3. Examine and compare mobile and cloud-based connection technologies

ISTM283CC Cyber Competition

Credits 3Fall

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels.

This course introduces students to capture-the-flag (CTF) cyber competitions, and teaches students who to pull their knowledge from other courses to solve cyber-related puzzles. This course will demand that students test their knowledge of various security domains, their problem solving skills, and learn a range of ethical hacking and reverse engineering tools to overcome the presented challenges. The current iteration of this course will have students competing in the National Cyber League (NCL) during the fall season. For student success, students should have taken ISTM140L, CIS122, and ISTM183C.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Students will use critical thinking and research skills to overcome CTF-style challenges
  2. Students will work with a range of ethical hacking and reverse engineering tools

ISTM283CO1 Cyber Operations 1

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: Corequisite: CIS153

Cyber Ops 1 introduces the core security concepts and skills needed to monitor, detect, analyze and respond to cybersecurity issues facing an organization. This course will emphasize the practical application of skills needed to maintain and ensure security operational readiness of secure networked systems. The skills developed in the curriculum prepares students for a career as Security Op Center analyst or Incident Responder.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Explain and and use hands on skills to show how to detect and respond to security incidents
  2. Explain how organizations deal with cybercrime, cyberespionage, insider threats, advanced persistent threats, regulatory requirements, and related issues
  3. Practice job-ready skills for in-demand job roles in cybersecurity operations

ISTM283CO2 Cyber Operations 2

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: ISTM283CO1

Cyber Ops 2 takes the student deeper into the practical application of skills needed to maintain and ensure security operational readiness of secure networked systems. The skills developed in the curriculum prepares students for a national cyber competition.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compete in a national cyber team competition
  2. Develop knowledge base for industry recognized CCNA Cybersecurity Operations certification
  3. Explain and use hands on skills to show how to detect and respond to severe security incidents
  4. Explain how organizations deal with cybercrime, cyberespionage, insider threats, advanced persistent threats, regulatory requirements, and related issues
  5. Practice job-ready skills for in-demand job roles in cybersecurity operations

ISTM283F Practical Digital Forensics

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH020; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels.

This intermediate level course presents digital forensics instruction from a systems security perspective using a variety of software. Students participating in this class will use a variety of digital forensics tools; and are exposed to drive image making, working with various PC and Mobile device hardware, and investigations of files and documents. Investigative techniques practiced in this class are performed in a secure environment.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze various cases to determine digital actions of a user
  2. Compare and contrast analysis differences between common computer operating systems
  3. Demonstrate analysis techniques to open SAM, SYSTEM and SECURITY files
  4. Demonstrate the creation of a digital image of a physical storage device
  5. Describe an appropriate evidence handling process
  6. Describe how analysis of computer logs demonstrate attribution
  7. Describe various laws affecting the pursuance of a forensic analysis.
  8. Explain how deleted digital information can be recovered
  9. Using an existing report template, write a report of an analysis of digital evidence for a case
  10. Using common digital forensics tools, demonstrate the technique for locating a variety of file types

ISTM284E Ethical Hacking

Credits 3Winter

Registration Requirement: ISTM183C and ISTM140L or equivalent knowledge. Instructor approval required to override these .

This class demonstrates the ethical use of various "white hat" cyber penetration testing tools and techniques consistent with Ethical Hacking training. Network tools and techniques take place in an enclosed "sandbox" environment. Students are exposed to various computer hacking skills and analyze various protective measures and their effectiveness.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply a penetration a testing framework and methodology to find and act upon vulnerabilities in a given system
  2. Be able to find, choose, and use the appropriate utility or series of steps for a given task or exploit in penetration testing activities.
  3. Produce a formal written assessment at the end of penetration testing activities to be given and used by a client.

ISTM285E Advanced Ethical Hacking

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: ISTM284E and MTH060 with a "C" grade or higher.

This advanced course will build upon students understanding of ethical hacking and penetration testing concepts. Students will understand and know how to look for weaknesses and vulnerabilities in target systems and use the same knowledge and tools as a malicious hacker, but in a lawful and legitimate manner to assess the security posture of a target system(s). Objectives of this class will directly related to DoD recognized certification exams.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze cryptography algorithms and encryption techniques, and design implementation strategies for securing information
  2. Analyze different phases of hacking and recommend the strategy to use ethical hacking for assessing security of various components of information system
  3. Assess various network security techniques and tools and implement appropriate level of information security controls based on evidence, information, and research.
  4. Compare and contrast different hacking techniques and analyze the legal implications of hacking
  5. Compare and contrast various network security assessment and hacking tools
  6. Examine different vulnerabilities, threats and attacks to information systems and recommend the countermeasures.
  7. Assess ethical and legal requirements of security assessment and penetration testing and determine a strategy to comply with these requirements.

ISTM285W Web Application Penetration Testing

Credits 3Spring

Registration Requirement: RD090 and WR090, or IECC201R and IECC201W; and MTH060; each with a grade of "C" or better, or placement above stated course levels.

This course will focus on understanding common vulnerabilities in modern web applications. Students will learn how to enumerate and scan a web application, discover vulnerabilities, and craft exploits to launch against the application. Students will also learn the basics of how to secure web applications and how to document their findings.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Analyze vulnerable code to consider defenses and exploits
  2. Execute discovery scans against a web application to enumerate services and technologies
  3. Exploit and analyze client-side vulnerabilities
  4. Successfully select and use the correct tool or series of steps to engage in web application penetration testing activities
  5. Understand and analyze the basics of the HTTP protocol and its inherent vulnerabilities
  6. Understand the flow of and analyze web traffic, and also how to modify it

Course offered online

Cultural Literacy course